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2018 Senate Bill 787: Revise auto insurance medical benefit mandate on seniors
Introduced by Sen. Rick Jones (R) on January 25, 2018
To exempt a person age 65 or above from having to buy the unlimited personal injury protection (PIP) coverage mandated by the state’s no fault auto insurance law. Specifically, these individuals could buy either unlimited injury coverage or a policy that caps medical coverage at $50,000, with injury expenses above that amount covered by the individual's Medicare and related coverage.   Official Text and Analysis.
Referred to the Senate Insurance Committee on January 25, 2018
Reported in the Senate on June 7, 2018
With the recommendation that the substitute (S-4) be adopted and that the bill then pass.
Amendment offered by Sen. David Knezek (D) on June 7, 2018
To tie-bar the bill to Senate Bills 972 and 1014, meaning this bill cannot become law unless those ones do also. Those bills would restrict insurers from including non-driving factors in setting insurance premium prices.
The amendment failed 9 to 27 in the Senate on June 7, 2018.
    See Who Voted "Yes" and Who Voted "No".
Amendment offered by Sen. Jim Ananich (D) on June 7, 2018
To mandate that the alternative coverage proposed by the bill be at least 10 percent cheaper than the cost of the standard unlimited medical benefits coverage.
The amendment failed 17 to 19 in the Senate on June 7, 2018.
    See Who Voted "Yes" and Who Voted "No".
Amendment offered by Sen. Curtis Hertel, Jr. (D) on June 7, 2018
To require auto insurance buyers who qualify for the capped coverage to affirm this choice rather than make this option the automatic default.
The amendment passed by voice vote in the Senate on June 7, 2018
Passed 23 to 13 in the Senate on June 7, 2018.
    See Who Voted "Yes" and Who Voted "No".
(same description)
To exempt a person age 65 or above from having to buy the unlimited personal injury protection (PIP) coverage mandated by the state’s no fault auto insurance law. Specifically, these individuals could buy either unlimited injury coverage or a policy that caps medical coverage at $50,000, with injury expenses above that amount covered by the individual's Medicare and related coverage.
Received in the House on June 7, 2018
Referred to the House Insurance Committee on June 7, 2018

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