Legislation watch

My Legislators' Key Votes

How my representative and senator voted on important or interesting measures
My ZIP Code     My Street Name  such as "Broadway"

Sen. Curtis Hertel, Jr., D-East Lansing, District 23. 517-373-1734 . senchertel@senate.michigan.gov
Rep. Sarah Anthony, D-Lansing, District 68. (517) 373-0826. sarahanthony@house.mi.gov

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House Bill 4542: Collect state tax on out of state purchases
Passed 36 to 0 in the Senate on December 4, 2019
To establish a regulatory regime for collecting state sales and use tax on purchases by residents from internet and catalog merchants in other states. This follows the 2018 U.S. Supreme Court opinion in South Dakota v. Wayfair that allows states to levy sales and use tax on out of state sellers who have more than $100,000 in sales or 200 transactions annually in a state, and creates a collection system that meet standards suggested by the court's ruling. House Bills 4540 and 4541 authorize and create rules for smaller retailers selling into the state through third party “marketplace facilitators," which is the model used by Amazon.com.
Sen. Curtis Hertel, Jr. (D) 'Voted Yes'
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Senate Bill 341: Require warrant to get electronic information from devices
Passed 35 to 1 in the Senate on December 4, 2019
To require police to get a warrant to access information in an electronic device including cell phones, or to access electronic communication information from an internet service provider, with a number of exceptions and exclusions, including one for stolen device reports. The bill would also prohibit the warrantless use by police of “cell-site simulators” that mimic a cellular base station and can intercept cell phone data from individuals.
Sen. Curtis Hertel, Jr. (D) 'Voted Yes'
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Senate Bill 342: Ban police use of facial recognition technology
Passed 32 to 4 in the Senate on December 4, 2019
To prohibit law enforcement officials to obtain, access, or use any face recognition technology or any information obtained from the use of face recognition technology to enforce the law, with some exceptions. Evidence gathered with this technology could not be admitted in court. Exceptions include using the technology if an emergency poses "imminent risk to an individual or individuals of death, serious physical injury, sexual abuse, live-streamed sexual exploitation, kidnapping, or human trafficking" that the technology may prevent or stop.
Sen. Curtis Hertel, Jr. (D) 'Voted Yes'
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House Bill 4687: Permit deer baiting
Passed 21 to 14 in the Senate on November 13, 2019
To explicitly permit deer and elk baiting for hunting. This would be limited to 5 gallons of bait at each hunting site, with no piece of bait larger than a sugar beet. The bill is a response to a baiting ban imposed by a state Natural Resources Commission in 2018. Versions of the bill have passed both the state House and Senate, but news reports indicate Gov. Gretchen Whitmer is unlikely to sign it.
Sen. Curtis Hertel, Jr. (D) 'Voted No'
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House Bill 4710: Impose occupational licensure mandate on acupuncturists
Passed 30 to 6 in the Senate on November 13, 2019
To convert a registration mandate now imposed on acupuncturists into a comprehensive licensure regime, including training and apprenticeship requirements, license fees, regulations specified in the bill plus additional ones that state licensure officials would be authorized to impose, and more.
Sen. Curtis Hertel, Jr. (D) 'Voted Yes'
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Senate Bill 349: Let some liquor distillers get higher price from state
Passed 27 to 9 in the Senate on November 13, 2019
To allow liquor makers to get a higher wholesale price if 40 percent of the grain they use is grown in Michigan. Under Michigan's extraordinarily detailed "liquor control" regulatory regime, the state government is the sole statewide wholesaler of all distilled liquor, and sells to retailers at uniform statewide prices. Fiscal analysts project the bill would reduce state revenue by $9.4 million.
Sen. Curtis Hertel, Jr. (D) 'Voted Yes'
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House Bill 4980: Expand clearing criminal records (expungements)
Passed 95 to 13 in the House on November 5, 2019
To authorize automatic expungement of up to two felony and four misdemeanor convictions from an individual's public criminal history records. This would apply when 10 years have passed from the date of sentencing or discharge for a felony, and seven years after a misdemeanor, but would not apply for an assaultive crime, a "crime of dishonesty," or some others deemed “serious.”
Rep. Sarah Anthony (D) 'Voted Yes'
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House Bill 4982: Authorize marijuana offense expungements
Passed 101 to 7 in the House on November 5, 2019
To allow a person to petition to have a past marijuana criminal offense that would be legal under current law expunged from his or her record, and require courts to grant it.
Rep. Sarah Anthony (D) 'Voted Yes'
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House Bill 4981: Expand criminal record expungements to some traffic offenses
Passed 102 to 6 in the House on November 5, 2019
To allow some traffic offenses to be expunged or “set aside” from a person’s criminal record, but not drunk driving or offenses that caused a serious injury or death. The traffic violation records held by the Secretary of State for drivers license "points" and related purposes would not be affected.
Rep. Sarah Anthony (D) 'Voted Yes'
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House Bill 4985: Permit "one bad night" criminal record expungements
Passed 98 to 10 in the House on November 5, 2019
To permit several felony and misdemeanor convictions to be expunged from a person's criminal record where they were part of a single incident. This would not apply to assaultive crimes, dangerous weapon crimes and crimes punishable by 10 or more years in prison.
Rep. Sarah Anthony (D) 'Voted Yes'
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House Bill 4687: Permit deer baiting
Passed 57 to 49 in the House on November 5, 2019
To explicitly permit deer and elk baiting for hunting, and feeding deer and elk during hunting season. Baiting would be limited to 5 gallons of bait at each bait site. Separately, the bill would also establish that feeding wild birds or other wildlife is permissible if done in a way that excludes wild, free-ranging white-tailed deer and elk from gaining access to the feed. The bill is a response to a baiting ban imposed by a state Natural Resources Commission in 2018.
Rep. Sarah Anthony (D) 'Voted No'
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House Bill 4069: Give tax breaks for household “alternative energy” installations on October 29, 2019
To exclude from property tax assessments the value of solar panels, wind turbines and other “alternative energy systems” in a residence, and which produce less than 150 kilowatts of electricity for a household whose use does not exceed this level.
Sen. Curtis Hertel, Jr. (D) 'Voted Yes'
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House Bill 4308: Legalize fantasy sports gambling
Passed 69 to 39 in the House on October 30, 2019
To establish a permissive licensure and regulatory regime on fantasy sports games and contests that offer money prizes. The bill establishes an initial license fee of up to $50,000 for would-be vendors with $20,000 annual renewal fees. Individuals who run small scale fantasy sport games from their home would be exempt from licensure, and information obtained from a licensee’s records would be exempt from disclosure under the state's Freedom Of Information Act.
Rep. Sarah Anthony (D) 'Voted Yes'
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House Bill 4311: Legalize internet gambling
Passed 62 to 46 in the House on October 30, 2019
To establish a comprehensive regulatory and licensure regime that allows the Detroit and Michigan Indian casinos to enter the internet gambling business. Operators would have to pay $300,000 to get a license with a $100,000 annual fee, and an 8 percent tax would be levied on the gross internet gambling revenue.
Rep. Sarah Anthony (D) 'Voted Yes'
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House Bill 4916: Allow sports betting through Detroit casinos on October 30, 2019
To allow and establish a comprehensive licensure and regulatory regime for sports betting through Indian casinos and Detroit casinos, with an 8% tax on the gross receipts of the latter. Detroit casinos could also provide online sports betting.
Rep. Sarah Anthony (D) 'Voted Yes'
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Senate Bill 174: Revise livestock regulations, postpone hen cage size mandate
Passed 21 to 17 in the Senate on October 24, 2019
To overhaul existing rules on the livestock and farm animal industry, and expand the authority of state officials to establish new requirements and regulations, including ones to control the spread of animal diseases and infections. The bill also extends a 2020 deadline for imposing laying hen cage size requirements until the start of 2026.
Sen. Curtis Hertel, Jr. (D) 'Voted No'
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House Bill 4542: Collect state tax on out of state purchases
Passed 110 to 0 in the House on October 16, 2019
To establish a regulatory regime for collecting state sales and use tax on purchases by residents from internet and catalog merchants in other states. This follows the 2018 U.S. Supreme Court opinion in South Dakota v. Wayfair that allows states to levy sales and use tax on out of state sellers who have more than $100,000 in sales or 200 transactions annually in a state, and creates a collection system that meet standards suggested by the court's ruling. House Bills 4540 and 4541 authorize and create rules for smaller retailers selling into the state through third party “marketplace facilitators," which is the model used by Amazon.com.
Rep. Sarah Anthony (D) 'Voted Yes'
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Senate Bill 102: Juvenile justice “raise the age” reform
Passed 100 to 8 in the House on October 15, 2019
To reimburse counties for the cost of providing juvenile justice services to minors age 17 and under who are charged with a crime. This has been the contentious "who pays?" piece of a multi-bill initiative to no longer automatically treat minors who commit certain crimes as adults, and prohibit housing them in the same facilities with adult prisoners. Under the bill, counties would get 100 percent reimbursement from the state until October 2025, when the issue would be reviewed using cost data the legislation requires be assembled. With this weeks votes a broader "raise the age" reform effort now goes to Gov. Whitmer for approval.
Rep. Sarah Anthony (D) 'Voted Yes'
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House Bill 4325: Cancel rules restricting psychotherapy from "counselors"
Passed 38 to 0 in the Senate on October 17, 2019
To modify scope of practice and licensing requirements for licensed professional counselors, which prescribes the extent and limits of the medical interventions a licensee may perform. The bill is a response to rules proposed by state regulators to remove the ability of licensed "counselors" to diagnose and offer psychotherapy.
Sen. Curtis Hertel, Jr. (D) 'Voted Yes'
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House Bill 4628: Keep most traffic ticket records just four years
Passed 108 to 1 in the House on October 10, 2019
To revise a law that prescribes how long records of an individual's traffic offenses must be kept. Current law requires records for most violations to be kept for seven years, and certain serious violations for the rest of the violator’s life. The bill would change the minimum retention period to four years for violations that carry no drivers license “points,” and also for some violations that come with two- or three-points.
Rep. Sarah Anthony (D) 'Voted Yes'
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House Bill 4959: Empower state liquor regulators to seize and inspect products
Passed 101 to 8 in the House on October 10, 2019
To give the state Liquor Control Commission the power to seize beer, wine, mixed spirit and mixed wine drinks, in order to inspect for compliance with the state's extraordinarily detailed and complex "liquor control" regulatory and license regime. The bill would also repeal a one-year residency requirement imposed on applicants for a liquor wholesaler license, after the U.S. Supreme Court invalidated a similar Tennessee law as a violation of the U.S. Constitution's commerce clause.
Rep. Sarah Anthony (D) 'Voted Yes'
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House Bill 4961: Expand restrictions on liquor manufacturers
Passed 100 to 8 in the House on October 10, 2019
To prohibit licensed liquor manufacturers from requiring licensed wholesalers to give the manufacturer records related to the distribution of different brands, employee compensation or business operations that are not directly related to the distribution of the maker’s brands. The bill would also add other restrictions on liquor manufacturer business practices to the state's "liquor control" regulatory and license regime.
Rep. Sarah Anthony (D) 'Voted Yes'
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Senate Bill 47: Give tax breaks for household “alternative energy” installations
Passed 107 to 1 in the House on October 8, 2019
To exclude from property tax assessments the value of solar panels, wind turbines and other “alternative energy systems” as defined in the bill that are installed, replaced or repaired in a residence, and which produce less than 150 kilowatts of electricity for a household whose use does not exceed this level. Senate Bill 48 extends the same tax break to commercial entities, capped at systems valued at $80,000 or less.
Rep. Sarah Anthony (D) 'Voted Yes'
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Senate Bill 149: Adopt state road and transportation budget
Passed 22 to 16 in the Senate on September 24, 2019
To appropriate $5.386 billion in gross spending on roads, buses and other transportation programs in the fiscal year that begins Oct. 1, compared to $4.843 billion enrolled the previous year. Of this, $1.252 billion is federal money. The legislature did not enact a 45 cent per gallon gas tax increase proposed by Gov. Gretchen Whitmer (which was never introduced as legislation), but did include $468 million in state income tax revenue earmarked to roads by two previous legislatures. The legislature's budget also directs $400 million in additional state revenue generated by a growing economy to road repairs.
Sen. Curtis Hertel, Jr. (D) 'Voted No'
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Senate Bill 149: Adopt state road and transportation budget
Passed 58 to 51 in the House on September 24, 2019
The House vote on the transportation budget described above.
Rep. Sarah Anthony (D) 'Voted No'
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House Bill 4236: Adopt a state Higher Education budget
Passed 20 to 18 in the Senate on September 24, 2019
The Legislature's Higher Education budget for the 2019-20 fiscal year which begins Tuesday. This would appropriate $1.685 billion for state universities, compared to $1.669 billion enrolled the previous year. Part of each school's funding would be contingent on not increasing tuition and fees more than 4.4% or $587, whichever is greater.
Sen. Curtis Hertel, Jr. (D) 'Voted No'
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House Bill 4236: Adopt a state Higher Education budget
Passed 58 to 51 in the House on September 24, 2019
The House vote on the Higher Education budget described above.
Rep. Sarah Anthony (D) 'Voted No'
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Senate Bill 139: State Welfare and Medicaid budget for coming fiscal year
Passed 24 to 14 in the Senate on September 24, 2019
To adopt a state Department of Health and Human Services budget for the fiscal year that begins Oct. 1. This budget funds the state's social welfare programs and would appropriate $26.452 billion in gross spending, of which $18.393 billion is federal money; this budget is up from $24.880 billion enrolled the previous year. This is the largest state department budget, accounting for nearly 45 percent of all state spending.
Sen. Curtis Hertel, Jr. (D) 'Voted No'
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Senate Bill 139: State Welfare and Medicaid budget for next fiscal year
Passed 64 to 44 in the House on September 24, 2019
The House vote on the Welfare and Medicaid budget described above.
Rep. Sarah Anthony (D) 'Voted No'
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Senate Bill 455: Give more tax breaks to particular “data center” company
Passed 27 to 11 in the Senate on September 24, 2019
To authorize additional property tax exemptions to a particular “data center” business that is also benefiting from state “renaissance zone” subsidies and tax breaks. The bill appears to seek benefits for the Nevada company that occupied the former Steelcase “Pyramid” building in Grand Rapids.
Sen. Curtis Hertel, Jr. (D) 'Voted Yes'
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House Bill 4242: Appropriations: K-12 School Aid budget
Passed 21 to 17 in the Senate on September 19, 2019
The conference report for K-12 school aid budget for the fiscal year that begins Oct 1, 2019. The bill appropriates $15.235 billion compared to $14.765 billion approved the previous year, of which $1.749 billion is federal money. The bill increases state "foundation allowance" payments to schools by $120 per pupil for higher-spending school districts, and $240 per pupil for districts that get less funding; the minimum amount per student rises from $7,871 to $8,111. All Democrats and one Republican voted "no" on this budget.
Sen. Curtis Hertel, Jr. (D) 'Voted No'
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House Bill 4242: Appropriations: K-12 School Aid budget
Passed 91 to 18 in the House on September 19, 2019
The House vote on the K-12 budget described above. All Republicans were joined by 33 Democrats in voting "yes" on this budget.
Rep. Sarah Anthony (D) 'Voted No'
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House Bill 4189: Extend corporate subsidy deal for particular firm
Passed 30 to 6 in the Senate on September 17, 2019
To change the rules on annual state taxpayer subsidies granted to the former Federal Mogul company in the 2000s, so that the company that bought the firm in 2018 (Tenneco) can collect additional subsidies said to be around $12 million, on top of some $60 million already given to the owners of this facility over the years. As introduced, this bill would have prohibited modifications to these deals that extend taxpayer liability, as this bill now does.
Sen. Curtis Hertel, Jr. (D) 'Voted Yes'
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Senate Bill 319: Make more expensive rental property eligible for developer tax breaks
Passed 38 to 0 in the Senate on September 19, 2019
To increase the cap on the cash value of residential rental property eligible for property tax breaks under a “neighborhood enterprise zone” subsidy program for developers. The cap would rise from $80,000 per unit in cash value to $120,000 per unit, and this would be indexed to inflation going forward.
Sen. Curtis Hertel, Jr. (D) 'Voted Yes'
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House Bill 4710: Impose full licensure on acupuncturists
Passed 100 to 9 in the House on September 19, 2019
To convert a registration mandate now imposed on acupuncturists into a more comprehensive licensure regime, including training and apprenticeship requirements, license fees, regulations specified in the bill plus additional ones that state licensure officials would be authorized to impose, and more.
Rep. Sarah Anthony (D) 'Voted Yes'
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House Bill 4261: Name road segment after deceased politician
Passed 102 to 7 in the House on September 5, 2019
To designate a portion of US-24 in Wayne County as the "Julie Plawecki Memorial Highway."
Rep. Sarah Anthony (D) 'Voted Yes'
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Senate Bill 441: Increase state occupational license fees
Passed 38 to 0 in the Senate on August 29, 2019
To increase the license fees on a range of occupations in which licensure mandates are imposed as a condition of earning a living in the trade. Technically, this and a number of related bills repeal the sunsets of previously enacted fee increases that were styled as "temporary." In this case, the "temporary" higher fees will remain in effect through the 2023 fiscal year.
Sen. Curtis Hertel, Jr. (D) 'Voted Yes'
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Senate Bill 451: Extend electric ratepayer surcharges for low income heating subsidies
Passed 38 to 0 in the Senate on August 29, 2019
To extend until 2023 the sunset on a law that authorizes a surcharge of up to $1 per month on residential electric bills, and uses the money collected to give up to $50 million a year to social welfare program beneficiaries to pay their heating bills. The current levy imposed on electric service ratepayers for this is 91 cents per month.
Sen. Curtis Hertel, Jr. (D) 'Voted Yes'
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House Resolution 115: Urge indicted Rep. Larry Inman to resign
Passed 98 to 8 in the House on August 29, 2019
To urge Republican Rep. Larry Inman of Grand Traverse County to resign from the House. Inman is under federal indictment for allegedly "selling" his vote against labor law changes to union interests in return for campaign contributions. Among other things the resolution holds that Inman has "drawn ridicule and disgrace to the state and the House of Representatives..."
Rep. Sarah Anthony (D) 'Voted Yes'
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House Bill 4234: Authorize subsidized state farm loans for rainy weather
Passed 99 to 6 in the House on June 20, 2019
The House vote on the farm loan bill described above.
Rep. Sarah Anthony (D) 'Voted Yes'
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House Bill 4694: Authorize more school retiree “double dipping”
Passed 102 to 7 in the House on June 20, 2019
To revise a law that allows certain retired school employees to work in schools that need more staff in particular subjects while still collecting pension checks alongside their current pay. According to the House Fiscal Agency this would benefit some former staff brought back as instructors in a particular non-profit's reading program used by around 150 western Michigan schools, and like other "double dipping" exceptions in the law could potentially increase unfunded liabilities in the school pension system.
Rep. Sarah Anthony (D) 'Voted Yes'
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House Bill 4223: Mandate dental testing and screening for children
Passed 93 to 16 in the House on June 20, 2019
To mandate that children entering kindergarten or first grade for the first time bring a form signed by a dentist or dental hygienist certifying that the child's teeth were examined and assessed within the past six months. Also, to require the state welfare department to create a dental oral assessment program for children who did not get the exam before registering for school enrollment.
Rep. Sarah Anthony (D) 'Voted Yes'
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Senate Bill 47: Give tax breaks for household “alternative energy” installations
Passed 36 to 0 in the Senate on June 12, 2019
To exclude from property tax assessments the value of solar panels, wind turbines and other “alternative energy systems” that are installed, replaced or repaired in a residence, and which produce less than 150 kilowatts of electricity for a household whose use does not exceed this level. Senate Bill 48 extends the same tax break to commercial entities, capped at systems valued at $80,000 or less.
Sen. Curtis Hertel, Jr. (D) 'Voted Yes'
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House Bill 4246: House version, 2020 road and transportation budget
Passed 57 to 52 in the House on June 13, 2019
The House version of the fiscal year 2019-2020 Department of Transportation budget. This would appropriate $5.40 billion in gross spending, of which $1.34 billion is federal money. The budget does not "recognize" any revenue from a $2.5 billion, 45 cents per gallon gas tax increase proposed by Gov. Gretchen Whitmer, but does include a $542.5 million "fund shift" from a Republican proposal to no longer impose sales tax on fuel, replacing that levy with an equivalent increase in motor fuel (gas) taxes. Note: Most sales tax revenue goes to schools; the proposal assumes these school dollars will be replaced by extending sales tax to out-of-state catalog and internet sales after the U.S. Supreme Court lifted a ban on this last year.
Rep. Sarah Anthony (D) 'Voted No'
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House Bill 4397: No fault auto insurance reform "clean up" bill
Passed 33 to 4 in the Senate on June 4, 2019
To revise details of the no fault auto insurance reform bill signed into law in May (Senate Bill 1), in particular timing issues related to the implementation of the new law’s changes to minimum insurance coverage, and the customer discounts that those changes are intended to allow. This corrects provisions in Senate Bill 1 that would have required insurers to give customer discounts before the cost saving reforms required by the bill go into effect.
Sen. Curtis Hertel, Jr. (D) 'Voted Yes'
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House Bill 4397: No fault auto insurance reform "clean up" bill
Passed 89 to 20 in the House on June 4, 2019
The House vote on the auto insurance reform "cleanup" bill described above.
Rep. Sarah Anthony (D) 'Voted No'
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Senate Bill 1: Reform auto insurance
Passed 34 to 4 in the Senate on May 24, 2019
To no longer mandate that auto insurance policies include unlimited personal injury protection (PIP) coverage. Customers could still choose unlimited PIP coverage, or choose policies with PIP limits of $250,000, $500,000, and for individuals covered by Medicaid, $50,000. Seniors on Medicare and individuals covered by other health insurance with less than a $6,000 deductible could choose not to purchase any PIP coverage at all.
The bill would mandate that insurers reduce charges for the PIP component of a customer’s policy by a proportional amount.
Medical service providers and hospitals could not charge more for medical care given to crash victims than twice the amount prescribed for federal Medicare reimbursements (subject to some adjustments). Limits would also be applied to long term care costs.
Trial lawyers would be prohibited from suing insurance companies for reimbursement claims that have not been authorized or are not late, or if the attorney improperly solicited a case (“ambulance chasing”).
Insurers could not set rates on the basis of home ownership, educational level attained, occupation or credit score (but could use “credit information”). Zip codes would also be barred as a rate-setting factor, but insurers may still group ratings by 'territory.'
Sen. Curtis Hertel, Jr. (D) 'Voted Yes'
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Senate Bill 1: Reform auto insurance
Passed 94 to 15 in the House on May 24, 2019
The House vote on the auto insurance reform bill described above.
Rep. Sarah Anthony (D) 'Voted Yes'
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House Bill 4249: Revise multiline phone service 9-1-1 mandate
Passed 106 to 3 in the House on May 24, 2019
To repeal the authority of the Michigan Public Service Commission to impose rules on businesses and organizations with multiline telephone systems, and instead spell out the relevant rules in state statute (law). The bill was introduced in response to rules that have been promulgated under a 2016 law that critics say far exceed the scope envisioned by its authors.
Rep. Sarah Anthony (D) 'Voted Yes'
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House Bill 4434: Revise concealed pistol license violation sanctions
Passed 90 to 19 in the House on May 24, 2019
To repeal criminal sanctions for carrying a concealed pistol after an individual's concealed pistol license has expired (currently up to five years in prison and a $2,500 fine), with a civil fine of $330 for carrying a pistol after failing to renew a license that is less than one year past its expiration. Bill supporters contend that the current penalty is excessive for that they call a "paperwork" crime.
Rep. Sarah Anthony (D) 'Voted No'
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House Bill 4095: Revise foster care home zoning restriction
Passed 73 to 36 in the House on May 21, 2019
To revise a law that prohibits local zoning codes from excluding a child foster care facility with six or fewer residents from being located in a residential neighborhood. The bill changes this to prohibit zoning ordinances that ban foster care homes with up to 10 residents if they are located on 20 acres or more.
Rep. Sarah Anthony (D) 'Voted No'
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Senate Bill 229: Ban “dismemberment abortion”
Passed 22 to 16 in the Senate on May 14, 2019
To include “dismemberment abortion,” otherwise known as "dilation and evacuation" or D&E, in the acts specified in the state’s ban against late-term “partial birth” abortions. Unless it is to save the life of the mother, providers who perform the procedure would be liable to two years in prison and a $50,000 fine; a woman who seeks or obtains an abortion would have no criminal or civil liability.
Sen. Curtis Hertel, Jr. (D) 'Voted No'
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Senate Bill 106: Ban selling “e-cigarettes” to minors
Passed 100 to 9 in the House on May 15, 2019
To ban selling or giving minors electronic "vapor products" ("vapes") or any device that delivers nicotine. The bill would also authorize imposing 16 hours of community service and a “health promotion and risk reduction assessment program” on a minor who possesses or tries to buy a nicotine vapor product, along with a $50 fine. The community service penalty would double and triple for second and subsequent offenses, but the fine would still be $50. A person who sells tobacco or vapes to a minor would be subject to fines of $100 to $2,500 for a third offense.
Rep. Sarah Anthony (D) 'Voted Yes'
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House Bill 4320: Ban “dismemberment abortion”
Passed 58 to 51 in the House on May 14, 2019
The House version of the proposal to include “dismemberment abortion” in the acts prohibited by the state’s ban on late-term “partial birth” abortions. This is a separate bill but its provisions are the same as Senate Bill 229, described above.
Rep. Sarah Anthony (D) 'Voted No'
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Senate Bill 1: Senate version, no-fault auto insurance reform
Passed 24 to 14 in the Senate on May 7, 2019
To no longer mandate that auto insurance policies include unlimited personal injury protection (PIP) coverage. A customer could theoretically keep the unlimited PIP (if it remains available), or choose policies with $250,000 PIP limits. Individuals with other health insurance (including Medicare and Medicaid) could choose not to purchase any PIP coverage at all.
The Michigan Catastrophic Claims Association (MCCA) that covers the cost of unlimited PIP claims above specified amounts would be phased out by limiting its liabilities to claims covered by pre-existing policies but not new ones sold after the bill goes into effect. This would reportedly reduce MCCA surcharges on individual insurance bills by $180, based on a $220 rate that goes into effect in July 2019.
Medical service providers and hospitals could not charge more for medical care given to crash victims than the amounts prescribed by the state’s injured workers compensation insurance law. Limits would also be applied to long term care costs including weekly “attendant care” hours provided by relatives.
The bill would also make trial lawyers liable for insurance company costs incurred defending against lawsuits based on claims for excessive or medically unnecessary crash victim treatments, or if the attorney improperly solicited a case (“ambulance chasing”). It would create a State Police automobile insurance fraud task force tasked with pursuing and prosecuting fraud cases.
A Democratic amendment was adopted that would restrict insurers from setting rates on the basis of two specific “non-driving factors,” gender and the zip code where the car is garaged.
Sen. Curtis Hertel, Jr. (D) 'Voted No'
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House Bill 4397: House version, no-fault auto insurance reform
Passed 61 to 49 in the House on May 9, 2019
The House version of an auto insurance reform bill. This is similar to the Senate-passed reform bill described above, with these differences:
The House would not eliminate unlimited personal injury protection (PIP) coverage, but would permit insurance policies with PIP limits of $50,000, $250,000 and $500,000. Like the Senate version, individuals with other health insurance (including Medicare and Medicaid) could choose not to purchase any PIP coverage at all. The House bill attaches specific rate reduction mandates to these choices depending on the coverage selected.
The House would allow more restrictions on insurers setting rates on the basis of “non-driving factors.” State regulators would be required to ban factors with “no rational correlation between the factor and insurance losses.”
Under current law, Michigan insurance companies must file rate structure changes with the state but can start using them right away ("file and use"). The House bill would require auto insurers to wait 90 days after filing before using new rates.
Other provisions including hospital price controls and limits on trial lawyers are very similar to the Senate-passed reform bill described above.
Rep. Sarah Anthony (D) 'Voted No'
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House Bill 4206: Accept Senate's limit on "polar vortex" school employee compensation
Passed 56 to 53 in the House on May 1, 2019
To concur with the Senate version of the bill allowing schools to not have to make up school days missed due to the 2019 "polar vortex" cold snap, but without the House-passed provision requiring school districts to also pay hourly employees for missed school days.
Rep. Sarah Anthony (D) 'Voted No'
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House Bill 4001: Require conviction for property forfeiture
Passed 37 to 1 in the Senate on April 25, 2019
To establish that property seized from a person because it may be associated with a suspected drug-related crime is not subject to “civil asset forfeiture” unless the individual is actually convicted or accepts a plea bargain. See also House Bill 4001 above. Forfeiture is a legal process by which a government agency (usually police or prosecutors) acquires permanent ownership of property seized by police.
Sen. Curtis Hertel, Jr. (D) 'Voted Yes'
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House Bill 4286: Make good on wrongful imprisonment compensation promise
Passed 38 to 0 in the Senate on April 25, 2019
To appropriate $10 million to make good on the promise made by a 2016 law that authorized payment of $50,000 for each year of wrongful imprisonment served by a person who did not commit the crime. The bill would require the Attorney General to file reports with the legislature on the status of claims, settlements and awards under this law. Reportedly the fund created to provide this compensation currently has just $1.1 million, and the estimated amount of claims is $22 million.
Sen. Curtis Hertel, Jr. (D) 'Voted Yes'
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Senate Bill 122: Reduce student test score measurements in teacher ratings
Passed 109 to 1 in the House on April 25, 2019
To delay for one year a requirement that annual year-end evaluation ratings of public school classroom teachers be 40 percent based on student growth and assessment data (state-administered tests), with the rest of the evaluation based on more subjective factors determined by local school administrators. Under current law this standard would go into effect for the 2018-2019 school year. The House also passed Senate Bill 202 to delay similar standards for administrators.
Rep. Sarah Anthony (D) 'Voted Yes'
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House Bill 4133: Juvenile justice “raise the age” reforms
Passed 101 to 9 in the House on April 25, 2019
To raise the age of defendants from age 17 to age 18 in the factors considered when determining juvenile vs. adult court jurisdiction over a minor accused of certain crimes. This is part of a broader "raise the age" juvenile justice reform effort.
Rep. Sarah Anthony (D) 'Voted Yes'
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Senate Bill 2: Require conviction for seized property forfeiture
Passed 107 to 3 in the House on April 24, 2019
To establish that property seized from a person because it may be associated with a crime is not subject to “civil asset forfeiture” unless the individual is actually convicted or accepts a plea bargain, subject to various exceptions and conditions. This would not apply to police seizures of property worth $50,000 or more.
Note: With passage of this and House Bills 4001 and 4002 this week the House and Senate finalized this proposal and sent it to Gov. Whitmer for approval.
Rep. Sarah Anthony (D) 'Voted Yes'
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House Bill 4001: Require conviction for property forfeiture
Passed 107 to 3 in the House on February 28, 2019
To establish that property seized from a person because it may be associated with a suspected drug-related crime is not subject to “civil asset forfeiture” unless the individual is actually convicted or accepts a plea bargain. This would not apply to police seizures of property worth $50,000 or more. Forfeiture is a legal process by which a government agency (usually police or prosecutors) acquires permanent ownership of property seized by police. House Bill 4002 prescribes specific procedures, notice requirements, deadlines and more.
Rep. Sarah Anthony (D) 'Voted Yes'
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House Concurrent Resolution 1: Disapprove executive order abolishing environmental regulation review panels
Passed 22 to 16 in the Senate on February 14, 2019
To disapprove Gov. Gretchen Whitmer's Executive Order No. 2019-02, which reorganizes and renames the state Department of Environmental Quality (henceforth the "Department of Environment, Great Lakes, and Energy"), creates several new bureaus within the department, and abolishes three other bureaus created by legislation enacted in 2018 and signed by former Gov. Rick Snyder.

The abolished entities are an environmental rules review committee tasked with assessing the reasonableness of new environmental regulations; an environmental permit appeal panel to review permit-related grievances from individuals and business; and an environmental science advisory board to advise the governor on environmental issues.

An executive order has the force of law unless it is disapproved within 60 days by a majority of those elected and serving in both the House and Senate. Both bodies have now done so, thereby halting the executive order.

Sen. Curtis Hertel, Jr. (D) 'Voted No'
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Senate Bill 2: Require conviction for seized property ownership forfeiture
Passed 36 to 2 in the Senate on February 13, 2019
To establish that property seized from a person because it may be associated with a suspected drug-related crime is not subject to “civil asset forfeiture” unless the individual is actually convicted or accepts a plea bargain. This would not apply to police seizures of property worth $50,000 or more. The bill also authorizes a process allowing individuals who have lower value property seized to just give it up, and revises procedural details for reimbursement claims by a person with an ownership interest in the seized property (for example the issuer of a vehicle loan).
Sen. Curtis Hertel, Jr. (D) 'Voted Yes'
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House Concurrent Resolution 1: Disapprove executive order abolishing environmental regulation review panels on February 6, 2019
To disapprove Gov. Gretchen Whitmer's Executive Order No. 2019-02, which reorganizes and renames the state Department of Environmental Quality (henceforth the "Department of Environment, Great Lakes, and Energy"), creates several new bureaus within the department, and abolishes three other bureaus created by legislation enacted in 2018 and signed by former Gov. Rick Snyder.

The abolished entities are an environmental rules review committee tasked with assessing the reasonableness of new environmental regulations; an environmental permit appeal panel to review permit-related grievances from individuals and business; and an environmental science advisory board to advise the governor on environmental issues.

An executive order has the force of law unless it is disapproved within 60 days by a majority of those elected and serving in both the House and Senate, meaning if the Senate concurs with this vote the departmental reorganization will not take place. The Senate Oversight Committee has held one hearing on the measure and plans to hold more before deciding whether to advance it to the full Senate.

Rep. Sarah Anthony (D) 'Voted No'
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Contact my lawmakers
Sen. Curtis Hertel, Jr., D-East Lansing, District 23. 517-373-1734 . senchertel@senate.michigan.gov
Rep. Sarah Anthony, D-Lansing, District 68. (517) 373-0826. sarahanthony@house.mi.gov


SOURCE: MichiganVotes.org, a free, non-partisan website created by the Mackinac Center for Public Policy, providing concise, non-partisan, plain-English descriptions of every bill and vote in the Michigan House and Senate. Please visit www.MichiganVotes.org.

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