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Legislation watch

My Legislators' Key Votes

How my representative and senator voted on important or interesting measures
My ZIP Code     My Street Name  such as "Broadway"

Rep. Andy Schor, D-Lansing, District 68. 517-373-0826. AndySchor@house.mi.gov
Sen. Curtis Hertel, Jr., D-East Lansing, District 23. 517-373-1734. senchertel@senate.michigan.gov
 

House Bill 4557: Authorize prison for bringing 26 or more cases of beer or wine into state
Passed 99 to 8 in the House on May 25, 2017 on May 25, 2017
The House vote on the bill described above.
Rep. Andy Schor (D) 'Voted Yes'
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Senate Bill 163: Authorize “Choose Life” license plate
Passed 25 to 11 in the Senate on April 27, 2017 on April 27, 2017
To require the Secretary of State to develop a “Choose Life” license plate, with the profits from its sale spent on "life-affirming programs and projects." This bill was vetoed by Gov. Rick Snyder.
Sen. Curtis Hertel, Jr. (D) 'Voted No'
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Legislative Initiative Petition 3: Mandate employers provide paid leave
Passed 24 to 13 in the Senate on September 5, 2018
To mandate that all employers in the state (except federal agencies) grant employees one hour of paid leave for every 30 hours worked, up to a total of 40 hours annually for small businesses, and 72 hours annually for larger employers. The leave could be used for individual or family medical issues, domestic violence issues, school meetings and more. Employers would be required to keep relevant records for five years, and under procedures specified in the measure, a violation claim by an employee could potentially subject an employer to a legal presumption of having broken the law.
Note: The measure was placed before the legislature by an initiated law petition drive, which requires it either be passed legislatively or placed on the ballot. If placed on the ballot and approved, any future amendments would require a ¾ supermajority vote in the House and Senate. But if enacted by the legislature, it can be amended later with a simple majority vote. Negotiations are underway over amending the measure after the November, 2018 election so as to require employers to provide paid leave but with less burdensome record keeping and legal liability provisions.
Sen. Curtis Hertel, Jr. (D) 'Voted No'
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Legislative Initiative Petition 3: Mandate employers provide paid leave
Passed 78 to 28 in the House on September 5, 2018
The House vote on the measure described above.


Legislative Initiative Petition 4: Increase statewide minimum wage mandate
Passed 24 to 13 in the Senate on September 5, 2018
To make it unlawful to pay a worker less than $12.00 per hour by 2022, by gradually increasing the current $9.25 per hour wage mandate. Also, to eliminate a lower minimum wage for tipped workers by 2024. (Under current law, while the mandated minimum is lower for tipped workers, if tips come up short then employers must still pay the difference between it and the regular minimum wage.) A lower minimum wage for 16- and 17-year-olds would also go up.
Note: The measure was placed before the legislature by an initiated law petition drive, so the same procedural issues described above are in play. In this case, negotiations are underway over amending the measure after the election by removing its elimination of a separate minimum wage for tipped workers.
Sen. Curtis Hertel, Jr. (D) 'Voted No'
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Legislative Initiative Petition 4: Increase statewide minimum wage mandate
Passed 78 to 28 in the House on September 5, 2018
The House vote on the measure described above.


House Bill 5377: Ban using subjective considerations in parole decisions: on September 5, 2018
To require that any parole board departure from state parole guidelines be for substantial and compelling reasons that are "objective" and stated in writing. The bill prescribes a list of circumstances that would constitute substantial and compelling objective reasons for departing for the guidelines when considering a particular case and prisoner.
Sen. Curtis Hertel, Jr. (D) 'Voted Yes'
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Senate Bill 343: Give students government predictions related to careers
Passed 96 to 13 in the House on June 12, 2018
To require school districts to give students a regional “career outlook” forecast document created by a government Bureau of Labor Market Information and Strategic Initiatives. This would be part of a process that seventh-graders must undergo of creating an educational development plan with school officials.


Senate Bill 302: Revise state land ownership limits
Passed 66 to 43 in the House on June 12, 2018
To eliminate a cap on the amount of acres the state can own in the northern part of the state, but require additional procedures for new land acquisitions. Acquisitions would not be allowed if the state fails to make full “payments in lieu of property taxes” (PILT) on state land to local governments. Other changes generally facilitate making acquisitions that increase access to state land for recreation and resource use, and revise other state land management details.


House Bill 5579: Appropriations, “Omnibus” education budget
Passed 25 to 11 in the Senate on June 12, 2018
The state education budget for the fiscal year that begins Oct 1, 2018. This appropriates $16.843 billion, including $1.843 billion of federal money. Of this, $14.765 billion goes to K-12 public schools, up from $14.580 billion this year. Another $1.669 billion is for state universities, compared to $1.629 billion this year. Community colleges get $408 million, up from $399 million. The bill increases the basic state "foundation allowance" grants to public schools by $120 per pupil for higher-spending districts, and $240 per pupil for districts that get less funding.
Sen. Curtis Hertel, Jr. (D) 'Voted No'
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Senate Bill 683: Impose full licensure on acupuncturists
Passed 33 to 3 in the Senate on June 12, 2018
To convert a registration mandate now imposed on acupuncturists into a more comprehensive licensure regime, including training and apprenticeship requirements, license fees, regulations specified in the bill and additional ones that the Department of Licensing and Regulatory Affairs would be authorized to impose, and more.
Sen. Curtis Hertel, Jr. (D) 'Voted Yes'
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Senate Bill 331: Impose licensure on genetic counselors
Passed 33 to 3 in the Senate on June 12, 2018
To impose licensure, fees, certification through a nationally recognized agency, and more on “genetic counselors” as they are defined in the bill.
Sen. Curtis Hertel, Jr. (D) 'Voted Yes'
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Senate Bill 916: Impose licensure mandate on “automatic recycling kiosks”
Passed 98 to 11 in the House on June 12, 2018
To require second-hand goods and junk dealers that use an “automatic recycling kiosk” to obtain a license from the local government in each jurisdiction where one is located. “Automatic recycling kiosk” is defined as one that verifies identity by “remote examination of a seller's government-issued identification card by a live representative during all hours of operation,” and that captures and stores images of the seller and goods.


House Bill 5955: Preempt local government occupational licensure mandates
Passed 58 to 50 in the House on June 12, 2018
To prohibit local governments from imposing new licensure mandates on individuals seeking to earn a living in a particular occupation if the state already imposes its own licensure mandate on that occupation. Locals could keep their current licensure mandates but not impose any new ones.


Legislative Initiative Petition 2: Repeal prevailing wage law
Passed 23 to 14 in the Senate on June 6, 2018
To repeal the state prevailing wage law, which prohibits awarding government contracts to contractors who submit the lowest bid unless the contractor pays wages based on union pay scales that local union officials represent as prevalent in a particular area. The voter-initiated legislation was placed before the legislature by petition, and does not require the Governor's approval to become law.
Sen. Curtis Hertel, Jr. (D) 'Voted No'
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Legislative Initiative Petition 2: Repeal prevailing wage law
Passed 56 to 53 in the House on June 6, 2018
The House vote on the prevailing wage law repeal described above.


Senate Bill 787: Allow lower cost auto insurance option for seniors
Passed 23 to 13 in the Senate on June 7, 2018
To exempt a person age 65 or above from having to buy the unlimited personal injury protection (PIP) coverage mandated by the state’s no fault auto insurance law. Specifically, these individuals could buy either unlimited coverage or a policy that caps medical coverage at $50,000, with injury expenses above that amount covered by the individual's Medicare and related coverage. By the same margin the Senate also passed Senate Bill 1014, which restricts charges for long term attendant care provided by family members to crash victims under the standard unlimited medical benefit coverage.
Sen. Curtis Hertel, Jr. (D) 'Voted No'
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Senate Bill 897: Impose work requirement on able-bodied Medicaid recipients
Passed 62 to 47 in the House on June 6, 2018
To require state welfare officials to seek federal permission to allow requiring able-bodied individuals enrolled in the Medicaid expansion authorized by the federal health care law to work at least 80 hours a month for at least nine months a year, or be in school, job-training or volunteer work. The bill authorizes exceptions for a parent with children under age six, individuals getting disability benefits or above age 62, a disabled person's caretaker and more.


Senate Bill 897: Impose work requirement on able-bodied Medicaid recipients
Passed 25 to 11 in the Senate on June 7, 2018
The Senate vote to concur with the House-passed version of the bill described above.
Sen. Curtis Hertel, Jr. (D) 'Voted No'
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Senate Bill 941: Spend $100 million on job training and preparation programs
Passed 30 to 2 in the Senate on May 30, 2018
To spend $100 million on government job and career training programs, scholarships, program grants and more, which would be labeled a “Marshall plan for talent.” Senate Bill 942 would authorize paying for this with money borrowed against revenues from a 1998 state tobacco lawsuit settlement.
Sen. Curtis Hertel, Jr. (D) 'Voted Yes'
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Senate Bill 653: Create environmental permit appeal panel
Passed 58 to 50 in the House on May 22, 2018
To create a state environmental permit appeal panel comprised of certain officials and representatives of specified interests including business and environmentalist organizations. A permit applicant aggrieved by permit denial could appeal to the panel, which would have the authority to revise or reject state environmental regulators' decision or conditions of a permit.


House Bill 6043: Require report to state of disclosures on prospective school employees
Passed 88 to 21 in the House on May 24, 2018
To expand a law that requires individuals who apply for a school job to sign a document that authorizes the applicant’s current or former employers to disclose any unprofessional conduct to the school. The bill would require the school to report to the Department of Education any information obtained this way about sex or other crimes involving a minor, or inappropriate conduct involving a minor. This would also apply if a school receives similar information about a current employee. The department would be required to keep these reports for six years.


Senate Bill 872: Extend statute of limitations on criminal sexual conduct suits
Passed 99 to 10 in the House on May 24, 2018
To extend the statute of limitations to 10 years on filing civil lawsuits related to criminal sexual conduct offenses, or if the victim was a minor, until the individual turns 28 years of age. This would be retroactive for cases going back to 1997 that match the profile of offenses committed by convicted MSU sports doctor Larry Nassar, except a victim would have to file a suit within three months of the bill becoming law.


Senate Bill 826: Impose licensure on naturopathic physicians
Passed 24 to 11 in the Senate on May 17, 2018
To impose licensure and regulation on naturopathic physicians, with license fees, education requirements and more. The bill defines naturopathic medicine as “a system of practice that is based on the natural healing capacity of individuals.”
Sen. Curtis Hertel, Jr. (D) 'Voted No'
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Senate Bill 839: Revise mining permit amendment process
Passed 63 to 45 in the House on May 15, 2018
To establish streamlined procedures and timetables for a mining company getting revisions to restrictions in its state operating permit, with many exceptions. This would apply to determinations that a permit amendment does not “result in environmental impacts that are materially increased or different” from those specified in the original permit.


House Bill 5638: Revise groundwater withdrawal permit regime
Passed 93 to 15 in the House on May 17, 2018
To revise a 2008 law that imposed a comprehensive regulatory regime and restrictions on industrial, commercial and agricultural groundwater uses that might have a negative impact. The bill would allow a more streamlined process for agricultural and other withdrawals that meet certain conditions, and establish deadlines for state officials to process permit requests. It would also repeal a requirement that landowners make public certain agricultural well use information.


House Bill 5325: Let local business subsidy entities tax residences
Passed 76 to 32 in the House on May 16, 2018
To expand the taxing power of local authorities created to deliver direct and indirect subsidies to business property owners in “principal shopping districts” and “business improvement districts,” by letting them impose property taxes styled as “special assessments” on home and residential property owners. Under current law residential property is excluded from the levies these entities are authorized to impose.


House Bill 5902: Allow residential "cross-subsidization" of solar cell maker's lower electric rates
Passed 77 to 31 in the House on May 17, 2018
To allow the indefinite continuation of special discounted electricity rates granted by Consumers Energy to the Hemlock Semiconductor subsidiary of Dow Corning, which under a 2010 law were exempted from a ban on cross-subsidization between residential and commercial/industrial customers (meaning residential customers pay more while Hemlock pays less). The styles the discount as a privilege potentially available to all industrial customers, but details that limit it to just this one company. Note: Hemlock makes photovoltaic solar cells, which were recently granted tariff protection against foreign competition by the Trump administration.


House Bill 4158: Require conviction for property forfeiture to police
Passed 83 to 26 in the House on May 8, 2018
To establish that property seized from a person because it may be associated with a suspected drug crime is not subject to permanent forfeiture (loss of ownership) unless an individual is actually convicted. However, the conviction requirement would only apply to forfeitures of less than $50,000 (meaning police and prosecutors could still take and keep assets worth more than that using a lower burden of proof).


House Bill 5767: Let alcohol producers and wholesalers sponsor beer tents
Passed 105 to 2 in the House on May 3, 2018
To revise the extraordinarily detailed law establishing a comprehensive regulatory regime on the wholesale distribution of beer, wine and liquor, so as to allow manufacturers, wholesalers or retailers to get a special license to hold a beer or wine festival in which they provide the sponsor with beer or wine dispensing or cooling equipment and a brand-logoed tent.


Senate Bill 297: Mandate electrician have proof of licensure while on job
Passed 89 to 20 in the House on May 1, 2018
To mandate that an electrician on a job must show a government official or inspector a photo ID and evidence of licensure status if ordered. Also, to only allow an individual to get a "master electrician" license if an individual has at least 12,000 hours of experience in related work under the supervision of a master electrician, and has held an electrical journeyman's license for at least two years.


House Bill 5234: Authorize probation for medically frail prisoners
Passed 25 to 10 in the Senate on April 26, 2018
To let county sheriffs request and a court grant probation for a prisoner who is physically or mentally incapacitated due to a medical condition that renders the prisoner unable to perform activities of basic daily living, and/or the prisoner requires 24-hour care. Also, to let county sheriffs ask and a court grant a compassionate release if a physician determines the prisoner is not expected to live more than six months.
Sen. Curtis Hertel, Jr. (D) 'Voted Yes'
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Senate Bill 897: Require able-bodied Medicaid recipients to work
Passed 26 to 11 in the Senate on April 19, 2018
To require state welfare officials to seek permission from federal welfare officials for requiring able-bodied recipients of Medicaid health coverage to work at least 29 hours a week, or be in school, job-training or volunteer work. The bill authorizes exceptions for a parent with children under age six, individuals getting disability benefits, a disabled person's caretaker, and more, including temporary emergencies and "life-changing events." It would also require beneficiaries to verify compliance each month and verify family income changes within 10 days.
Sen. Curtis Hertel, Jr. (D) 'Voted No'
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House Bill 5012: Restrict election recounts when outcome isn't close
Passed 27 to 8 in the Senate on April 18, 2018
To make more rigorous the definition of “aggrieved candidate” in the law that authorizes recounts of elections where the vote margin isn't close. The bill reflects court rulings after the 2016 Green Party presidential candidate (reportedly with the assistance of Democratic Party operatives) orchestrated a statewide recount, even though this candidate received less than 2 percent of the Michigan vote.
Sen. Curtis Hertel, Jr. (D) 'Voted No'
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House Bill 4115: Increase nonprofit sales tax exemption
Passed 76 to 33 in the House on April 18, 2018
To exempt from sales tax the retail sales of a nonprofit organization that has less than $25,000 in aggregate annual retail sales during a year, rather than $5,000 under current law. Under current law if a group exceeds this threshold then all of its sales are taxable, and the bill would change this to exempt the first $10,000 in sales for groups that don't exceed the new cap.


House Bill 5687: Require resident alien’s drivers license to expire with visa
Passed 96 to 13 in the House on April 19, 2018
To require that a drivers license issued to a resident alien must have an expiration no later than the date on which the individual’s presence in the in the U.S. becomes unlawful.


House Bill 5001: Impose licensure mandate on professional foresters
Passed 32 to 2 in the Senate on April 12, 2018
To impose a new licensure mandate on professional foresters (styled by the bill as registration), with a $200 fee, regulations, education and experience requirements and more. The bill would create a state board comprised of officials and individuals currently in this or related businesses, which would devise specific rules, requirements and restrictions. This is related to a recent small forestland property tax break law that requires owners to engage the services of a forester to apply for the special tax treatment.
Sen. Curtis Hertel, Jr. (D) 'Voted Yes'
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Senate Bill 839: Revise mining permit amendment process
Passed 23 to 11 in the Senate on March 22, 2018
To establish streamlined procedures for a mining company getting certain restrictions in its state operating permit revised, subject to many exceptions. This would specifically apply to the process for determining that a permit amendment does not “result in environmental impacts that are materially increased or different” from those specified in the original permit. Among other things this refers to allowing a permittee “to relocate, reconfigure, or modify surface or underground facilities, buildings, or equipment, other than a tailings basin or a stockpile.”
Sen. Curtis Hertel, Jr. (D) 'Voted No'
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Senate Bill 872: Extend statute of limitations on criminal sexual conduct suits
Passed 28 to 7 in the Senate on March 14, 2018
To extend to 10 years the statute of limitations on filing a civil lawsuit related to criminal sexual conduct offenses, or if the victim was a minor, until the individual turns 48 years of age, with some narrow exceptions. This would apply retroactively to offenses committed after 1996, and would not require that any criminal prosecution or other legal action was ever brought as a result of an alleged offense. Alleged victims would have to file suits within one year after the bill becomes law.
Sen. Curtis Hertel, Jr. (D) 'Voted Yes'
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Senate Bill 637: Cap allowable fees for 'small cell wireless' systems
Passed 33 to 3 in the Senate on March 15, 2018
To establish a comprehensive regulatory regime for small cell wireless systems that use routers on power line poles and other existing infrastructure to provide cell phone and internet access without needing expensive towers. The bill would cap the amount that state and local governments could charge for zoning, permits and other fees.
Sen. Curtis Hertel, Jr. (D) 'Voted Yes'
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House Bill 5456: Ban asbestos lawsuit “double dipping”
Passed 35 to 1 in the Senate on March 15, 2018
To require plaintiffs who seek damages for alleged asbestos-related conditions to disclose whether they have already filed suits against trusts or claims pools created in previous asbestos bankruptcy cases. Reportedly some plaintiff attorneys have filed multiple suits seeking duplicate damages. The bill would also authorize reopening and readjusting cases and damage awards in such cases.
Sen. Curtis Hertel, Jr. (D) 'Voted Yes'
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House Bill 5180: Potentially permit air bows for hunting during firearms season
Passed 59 to 47 in the House on March 15, 2018
To potentially permit the use of pneumatic air bows to hunt game during any open season in which a firearm may be used, and also potentially permit disabled hunters to use air bows during bow season. Specifically, the bill allows but does not require state officials to authorize this. These devices are like crossbows but use compressed air to drive an arrow.


House Bill 4101: Authorize parole for “medically frail” prisoners
Passed 94 to 14 in the House on March 7, 2018
To allow medically frail prisoners whose condition makes them “a minimal threat to society” to be paroled to a hospital, hospice, nursing home or other suitable accommodation for the balance of their term.


Senate Bill 353: Preempt local bans on employers asking about past wages
Passed 62 to 46 in the House on March 7, 2018
To expand a law that prohibits local governments from restricting what prospective employers can ask on a job application. Among other things a local government could not prohibit an employer from asking about a prospective employee's previous salary history during a job interview.


House Bill 4053: Establish English as official state language
Passed 62 to 46 in the House on February 22, 2018
To establish English as the official state language. This would apply to government activities, but not to private sector activity. It would require governmental documents, records, meetings, actions, and policies to be in English, but would not prohibit them from also being in another language.


Senate Bill 551: Give political branches input on Natural Resource Trust Fund spending
Passed 56 to 53 in the House on February 21, 2018
To establish a Natural Resources Trust Fund advisory board comprised of the Governor, the state Treasurer, the Senate Majority Leader, the Speaker of the House (or their designees) and one member of an existing NRTF governing board, which would make non-binding recommendations for annual spending and operation of the fund. State land oil and gas royalty money is earmarked for this fund, which acquires and develops more land for recreational purposes


House Bill 4321: Authorize extra $160 million for road repairs
Passed 109 to 0 in the House on February 21, 2018
To appropriate $160 million from state general fund revenue to road repairs, and $15 million for "next generation technologies, hydrogen fueling stations, and demonstration projects related to enhanced transportation services for senior citizens." The road repair money would be divided between the state and local governments according to the usual road tax allocation formula.


House Bill 5040: "Driver responsibility fees” repeal and amnesty
Passed 36 to 0 in the Senate on February 14, 2018
To repeal the “driver responsibility fees” that are assessed for various traffic violations in addition to the fine for the violation itself. This and related bills would go into effect on Sept. 30, 2018, and would also clear any outstanding liability an individual may have to pay these fees, and allow reinstatement of drivers licenses suspended for non-payment with no charge. These very expensive fees were originally adopted in 2003 to increase state revenue collections.
Sen. Curtis Hertel, Jr. (D) 'Voted Yes'
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House Bill 5040: "Driver responsibility fees” repeal and amnesty
Passed 109 to 0 in the House on February 14, 2018
The House vote on the bill described above.


Senate Bill 748: Increase Michigan income tax personal exemption
Passed 36 to 0 in the Senate on February 14, 2018
To increase the $4,000 personal exemption that is currently allowed under the Michigan state income tax. The bill would immediately increase it to $4,050, and then gradually to $4,900 by 2021, with inflation adjustments thereafter. Taxpayers can claim a personal exemption for themselves, their spouse and each dependent, and these are subtracted from the amount of income that is subject to income tax.
Sen. Curtis Hertel, Jr. (D) 'Voted Yes'
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Senate Bill 748: Increase Michigan income tax personal exemption
Passed 107 to 2 in the House on February 14, 2018
The House vote on the bill described above.


Senate Bill 400: Increase tax imposed to pay for 9-1-1 cell phone services
Passed 98 to 11 in the House on February 14, 2018
To increase taxes imposed to pay for local 9-1-1 emergency phone service for cell phones. A monthly state user fee (tax) would go up from 19 cents to 25 cents per device, and the tax on pre-paid service from 1.92 percent to 5 percent.


House Bill 5456: Ban asbestos lawsuit “double dipping”
Passed 58 to 51 in the House on February 8, 2018
To require plaintiffs who seek damages for alleged asbestos-related conditions to disclose whether they have already filed suits against trusts or claims pools created in previous asbestos bankruptcy cases. Reportedly some plaintiff attorneys have filed multiple suits seeking duplicate damages. The bill would also authorize reopening and readjusting cases and damage awards in such cases.


Senate Bill 749: Increase child care income tax credit
Passed 37 to 0 in the Senate on January 24, 2018
To establish that an individual is entitled to claim the same child care tax credit against Michigan income tax as the credit authorized by the 2017 federal tax reform law. This is a means-tested credit that is based on a percentage of child care expenses that are related to the taxpayer having a job (up to $6,000, or $3,000 if there is just one dependent). The credit would not be "refundable" (meaning the taxpayer would not get a check from the state for the amount the credit exceeded their income tax liability).
Sen. Curtis Hertel, Jr. (D) 'Voted Yes'
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Senate Bill 652: Subject new environmental rules to authoritative review
Passed 26 to 11 in the Senate on January 25, 2018
To create a state environmental rules review committee comprised of certain officials and representatives of specified interests, with the duty to oversee and make judgments on whether plans by the Department of Environmental Quality to impose new rules meet certain specified criteria including reasonableness, and to propose revisions if they do not. The committee would be empowered to stop the DEQ from imposing a rule that did not meet the criteria. Senate Bill 653 was also adopted, which creates a similar authoritative oversight process for DEQ permit decisions.
Sen. Curtis Hertel, Jr. (D) 'Voted No'
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House Bill 5422: Authorize “refundable” $100 senior income tax credit
Passed 100 to 6 in the House on January 25, 2018
To authorize a $100 refundable tax exemption against the state income tax for individuals aged 62 and above. “Refundable” means the state will send the individual a check for the amount that the credit exceeds his or her tax liability.


House Bill 5420: Increase personal exemption in state income tax
Passed 105 to 1 in the House on January 25, 2018
To increase the $4,000 personal exemption that is currently allowed under the Michigan state income tax. The bill would immediately increase it to $4,300 and then gradually to $4,800 in 2021. Taxpayers can claim a personal exemption for themselves, their spouse and each dependent, and these are subtracted from the amount of income that is subject to income tax. The Senate has passed a version that increases the exemption to $4,700 by 2020.


Senate Bill 748: Increase Michigan income tax personal exemption
Passed 37 to 0 in the Senate on January 17, 2018
To increase the $4,000 personal exemption that is currently allowed under the Michigan state income tax. The bill would immediately increase it to $4,500, and then gradually to $4,700 by 2020, which with inflation adjustments is projected to be worth around $5,000 by then. Taxpayers can claim a personal exemption for themselves, their spouse and each dependent, and these are subtracted from the amount of income that is subject to income tax.
Sen. Curtis Hertel, Jr. (D) 'Voted Yes'
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Senate Bill 94: Override Governor's veto of "no sales tax on the difference"
Passed 37 to 0 in the Senate on January 17, 2018
To override Gov. Rick Snyder's veto of a bill that accelerates the 24-year phase-in of a 2013 law that exempted from sales tax the value of a trade-in when buying a new vehicle, RV or boat.
Sen. Curtis Hertel, Jr. (D) 'Voted Yes'
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Senate Bill 409: Facilitate private home Great Lakes harbor leases
Passed 59 to 48 in the House on January 18, 2018
To authorize 50 year "bottomland" leases for owners of single-family homes on Great Lakes shorelines who want to create a private, non-commercial, recreational harbor formed by a breakwater. Owners would have to pay 1 percent of their home's state equalized property value in an up-front lump sum payment every 25 years. The money would go into a segregated account that pays for parts of the Department of Environmental Quality's operations.


Senate Bill 574: Let charter schools get some ISD enhancement millage money: passed 55 to 52 in the House on January 18, 2018
To require revenue extracted by future regional enhancement property taxes that are levied by Intermediate School Districts and distributed to conventional public school districts to also be shared with public charter schools within the ISD's territory.


Senate Bill 702: Prohibit school districts from discriminating against charter schools
Passed 60 to 47 in the House on January 11, 2018
To expand the definition of “deed restriction” in a 2017 law that prohibits a school district or local government from refusing to sell property to a competing charter or private school. The bill would close a loophole that the Detroit school district has used in refusing to sell a shuttered primary school to a charter.


House Bill 4176: Let neighborhood watch car mount flashing yellow lights
Passed 106 to 0 in the House on January 11, 2018
To let vehicles that participate in neighborhood watch programs have amber flashing lights.


House Bill 5094: Ban credit bureaus charging for security freeze
Passed 107 to 2 in the House on December 12, 2017
To prohibit the big consumer credit rating agencies from charging an individual who requests a security freeze following a security breach in one of these agency’s databases, such as the Equifax breach that reportedly put 140 million individuals at risk of identity theft.
Rep. Andy Schor (D) 'Voted Yes'
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Senate Bill 702: Ban school districts and local governments from discriminating against charter schools: on December 13, 2017
To expand the definition of “deed restriction” in a 2017 law that prohibits a school district or local government from refusing to sell property to a charter or private school, or from taking other actions designed to keep these potential conventional public school competitors from using property for a lawful educational purpose. The bill would close loopholes that cities and school districts have used to discriminate against charter schools.
Sen. Curtis Hertel, Jr. (D) 'Voted No'
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Senate Bill 469: Give some developers subsidies for rehabbing “historic” structures
Passed 36 to 2 in the Senate on December 13, 2017
To grant certain developers approved by state or local officials credits against the business income tax that are worth up to 25 percent of the amount spent to restore a structure that meets various criteria for being “historic.” Up to 90 percent of credits valued up to $250,000 would be "refundable," making them virtual cash subsidies.
Sen. Curtis Hertel, Jr. (D) 'Voted Yes'
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House Bill 4207: Subsidize grocery stores in cities
Passed 33 to 4 in the Senate on December 13, 2017
To authorize state subsidies for grocery stores in urban areas. This would come from money earmarked to an existing business subsidy program, and is estimated to be around $1 million to $2 million annually. The money could not be given to the owner of a grocery store located within a mile of an existing store.
Sen. Curtis Hertel, Jr. (D) 'Voted Yes'
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House Bill 4320: Spend more for environmental cleanups, borrow more for colleges
Passed 33 to 4 in the Senate on December 13, 2017
To appropriate $52.8 million for various state departments and functions in the current fiscal year, including $23.2 million for remediation activities related to recently reported instances of groundwater contamination by a chemical called perfluoroalkyl. The bill also authorizes $74.6 million in new long term debt for state university and college construction projects and $57 million for a State Police construction project.
Sen. Curtis Hertel, Jr. (D) 'Voted Yes'
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House Bill 4320: Spend more for environmental cleanups, borrow more for colleges
Passed 109 to 1 in the House on December 13, 2017
This is the same bill as the one above that passed the Senate.
Rep. Andy Schor (D) 'Voted Yes'
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Senate Bill 167: Expand opioid prescription restrictions and reporting
Passed 83 to 27 in the House on December 13, 2017
To require a doctor to have a “bona fide prescriber-patient relationship” before prescribing opioid and other painkillers that are subject to abuse, and authorize sanctions on a doctor who fails to first check the patient’s prescription record on a state database that collects this information before prescribing.
Rep. Andy Schor (D) 'Voted Yes'
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Senate Bill 478: Ban drivers license renewal if three unpaid parking tickets
Passed 74 to 36 in the House on December 13, 2017
To repeal the Jan. 1, 2018 sunset on a 2014 law that reduced from six to three the number of unpaid parking tickets a person can have before the Secretary of State will not renew a drivers license until the tickets are paid along with a $45 "clearance" fee. The bill would leave the more stringent regime in place permanently.
Rep. Andy Schor (D) 'Voted Yes'
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Senate Bill 544: Create framework for 'enhanced education savings accounts'
Passed 23 to 14 in the Senate on December 5, 2017
To create an enhanced education savings accounts program that would allow individuals to make tax-deductible contributions to an account used to pay for public school extracurricular activities, vocational programs or other services that schools are not required to provide. Note that while the Senate passed this and some related bills, it did not pass a bill authorizing the tax deductions (Senate Bill 549), without which this and the other bills in the package appear to be moot.
Sen. Curtis Hertel, Jr. (D) 'Voted No'
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Senate Bill 400: Increase tax imposed to pay for 9-1-1 phone services
Passed 30 to 6 in the Senate on December 6, 2017
To increase phone service levies and cell phone taxes imposed to pay for local 9-1-1 emergency phone service. The tax on cell phone contracts would rise from 1.92 percent to 4.19 percent, with a monthly user fee (tax) rising from 19 cents to 25 cents.
Sen. Curtis Hertel, Jr. (D) 'Voted Yes'
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Senate Bill 501: Revise liquor store territory rationing
Passed 27 to 9 in the Senate on December 6, 2017
To prohibit giving a new package liquor store license to a store that would be within half a mile of an existing seller, with a number of specific exceptions.
Sen. Curtis Hertel, Jr. (D) 'Voted Yes'
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House Bill 5298: Require disclosure of municipal employee retirement benefit underfunding
Passed 105 to 5 in the House on December 6, 2017
This is the same bill as Senate Bill 686 described above.
Rep. Andy Schor (D) 'Voted Yes'
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Senate Bill 275: Ban police sex with prostitutes
Passed 91 to 17 in the House on November 30, 2017
To repeal an exemption that allows police to have sex with a prostitute as part of an investigation.
Rep. Andy Schor (D) 'Not Voting'
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Senate Bill 584: Expand concealed pistol “no-carry zone” exemptions
Passed 25 to 12 in the Senate on November 8, 2017
To authorize an exemption from the “no-carry zone” restrictions in the law authorizing shall-issue concealed pistol licenses, if a licensee gets extra training. No-carry zones include schools, day care facilities, sports stadiums or arenas, bars, bar/restaurants, places of worship, college and university dorms and classrooms, hospitals, casinos, large entertainment facilities and courts. Under the bill private property owners, colleges and universities could still ban guns, schools could prohibit teachers and staff from carrying guns, and licensees could not openly carry a gun in a no-carry zone.
Sen. Curtis Hertel, Jr. (D) 'Voted No'
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House Bill 4500: Define fetus as “person” in criminal sentencing
Passed 63 to 44 in the House on November 9, 2017
To revise a provision of the state’s criminal sentencing guidelines that includes the number of actual or potential victims among the factors on which sentences for violent crimes are assessed. The bill would define an embryo or fetus as a "person" and a victim for purposes of this provision.
Rep. Andy Schor (D) 'Voted No'
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House Bill 5013: Adopt auto insurance reforms and price controls
Failed 45 to 63 in the House on November 2, 2017
To allow vehicle owners to purchase auto insurance policies with personal injury protection (PIP) coverage below the currently mandated unlimited coverage; cap the amount that hospitals, doctors and long-term care providers could charge to treat people injured in crashes; and more. Among other things the bill would require insurance companies to lower rates if these provisions lowered the cost of treating crash victims, which reportedly are much higher in Michigan than any other state.
Rep. Andy Schor (D) 'Voted No'
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House Bill 5040: “Bad driver tax” repeal and amnesty
Passed 103 to 5 in the House on November 2, 2017
To repeal the “driver responsibility fees” that are assessed for various violations, effective Sept. 30, 2018. The bill would also clear any outstanding liability an individual may have to pay these fees. These very expensive fees were originally adopted in 2003 to increase state revenue collections. The Senate has passed a repeal that only clears liabilities older than six years.
Rep. Andy Schor (D) 'Voted Yes'
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House Bill 5012: Restrict election recounts when outcome isn't close
Passed 98 to 10 in the House on November 1, 2017
To make more rigorous the definition of “aggrieved candidate” in the law that authorizes recounts of elections where the vote margin isn't close. The bill reflects court rulings after the 2016 Green Party presidential candidate (reportedly with the assistance of Democratic Party operatives) orchestrated a statewide recount, even though this candidate received less than 2 percent of the Michigan vote.
Rep. Andy Schor (D) 'Voted Yes'
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House Bill 5095: Adopt Coast Guard ballast water discharge permit standards
Passed 66 to 42 in the House on November 2, 2017
To adopt the U.S. Coast Guard standards for ballast water discharges from oceangoing vessels. Michigan adopted its own standards in 2006, which was before the Coast Guard finalized theirs in 2012. The standards are intended to combat the threat of invasive species.
Rep. Andy Schor (D) 'Voted Yes'
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House Bill 4805: Ban imposing “educational development plan” on home school students
Passed 101 to 5 in the House on October 26, 2017
To prohibit officials from requiring the parents of a homeschooled student who is enrolled in a public school part time and taking some public school classes (including "virtual" or online classes) to file an “educational development plan” with a public school district. These plans often but not necessarily apply to public school students who are falling behind.
Rep. Andy Schor (D) 'Voted Yes'
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Senate Bill 609: Repeal 'driver responsibility fees' and give partial amnesty
Passed 37 to 0 in the Senate on October 19, 2017
To repeal the driver responsibility fees (“bad driver tax”) that are assessed for various traffic violations, effective Sept. 30, 2018. Individuals who lost their driver's license for nonpayment of these fees could get it back (on payment of a $125 fee). Fees that have been owed for more than six years would be forgiven, but not more recent ones. These very expensive fees were originally adopted in 2003 to increase state revenues.
Note: House Bill 5040 would end the fees and give amnesty for all amounts owed, not just amounts in arrears for six years. The Snyder administration indicated the Governor would veto this due to the state revenue loss, and this bill's partial amnesty is seen as a negotiating position on that. More than 300,000 people owe more than $600 million for these fees, much of which is uncollectible, and thousands have lost their driver's license for nonpayment.
Sen. Curtis Hertel, Jr. (D) 'Voted Yes'
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Senate Bill 574: Let charter schools get some ISD enhancement millage money on October 18, 2017
To require revenue extracted by future regional enhancement property taxes that are levied by Intermediate School Districts and distributed to conventional public school districts to also be shared with public charter schools within the ISD district.
Sen. Curtis Hertel, Jr. (D) 'Voted No'
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House Bill 4457: Authorize new energy debt scheme for colleges and universities
Passed 38 to 0 in the Senate on October 17, 2017
To include state colleges and universities in the kind of debt scheme authorized by a 2016 law for school districts, which lets them contract with vendors for energy efficiency projects, and pay for these with money the projects are supposed to save (or from regular tax revenue if savings don’t appear).
Sen. Curtis Hertel, Jr. (D) 'Voted Yes'
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Senate Bill 98: Authorize more “promise zone” tax increment financing authorities
Passed 89 to 18 in the House on October 17, 2017
To expand from 10 to 15 the number of “promise zone” tax increment financing authorities (TIFA) located in low income and “low educational attainment” areas. These entities were authorized by a 2008 law to “capture" a portion of the state school property tax collected in the area, and use the money to partially subsidize college tuition for local students.
Rep. Andy Schor (D) 'Voted Yes'
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House Bill 4583: Use "orphaned" fuel tank cleanup revenue for other purposes
Passed 26 to 10 in the Senate on October 10, 2017
To divert money from a 7/8 cent per gallon gas tax originally levied to pay for cleanups of leaking underground fuel tanks that were abandoned decades earlier and where no known party is liable ("orphan sites"). The bill would authorize subsidies to current fuel tank owners who are liable for contamination that occurred before 2015; to developers of "brownfield" property with leaking tanks; and to local governments for cleanups related to past road work.
Sen. Curtis Hertel, Jr. (D) 'Voted No'
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House Bill 4066: Authorize limited interstate medical licensure agreement
Passed 100 to 6 in the House on October 10, 2017
To enter an agreement with other states to facilitate doctors getting licensed in more than one state. The measure would not eliminate the need for doctors to get a separate license to practice in each state, or change current restrictions on the practice of telemedicine. It would require doctors to hold one of the board certifications marketed by certain national organizations, which would have the effect of excluding most Michigan practitioners from the proposed licensure process.
Rep. Andy Schor (D) 'Voted Yes'
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House Bill 4508: Create a “cyber civilian corps"
Passed 36 to 0 in the Senate on October 10, 2017
To create a state “cyber civilian corps" to organize civilian volunteers with relevant experience who would provide rapid response assistance to a municipal, educational, nonprofit or business entity that needs help dealing with a cybersecurity incident.
Sen. Curtis Hertel, Jr. (D) 'Voted Yes'
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Senate Bill 583: Ban local food and beverage taxes
Passed 31 to 5 in the Senate on October 4, 2017
To prohibit local governments and authorities from imposing a tax or fee on the manufacture, distribution, wholesaling or retail sale of food for immediate consumption or non-immediate consumption. Among other things this would prohibit local officials from imposing soda taxes.
Sen. Curtis Hertel, Jr. (D) 'Voted Yes'
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Senate Bill 375: Authorize county subsidies for methane digester generators
Passed 36 to 0 in the Senate on October 3, 2017
To permit counties to include methane digester energy systems in a program that lets the county borrow money, lend it to a property owner money for a “renewable energy system,” and levy a special assessment on the property from which the loan would be repaid.
Sen. Curtis Hertel, Jr. (D) 'Voted Yes'
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Senate Bill 552: Increase annual ORV tax
Passed 35 to 1 in the Senate on October 5, 2017
To increase the annual off road vehicle license tax to $26.25 for a license that does not authorize operation on state ORV trails, and $36.25 for one that does. If no action is taken the tax expires in March 2018, but if the bill becomes law the tax will remain through March 2024 (unless extended by another bill before then).
Sen. Curtis Hertel, Jr. (D) 'Voted Yes'
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Senate Bill 353: Preempt local bans on employers asking about past wages
Passed 27 to 9 in the Senate on October 5, 2017
To expand a law that prohibits local governments from imposing mandatory job interview information requirements or restrictions. Among other things the bill would ban local ordinances that prohibit a local employer or the local government itself from asking about a prospective employee's previous salary history.
Sen. Curtis Hertel, Jr. (D) 'Voted No'
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Senate Bill 223: Create process for disclosing police firing to other agencies
Passed 105 to 2 in the House on October 3, 2017
To establish a process and liability exemption for a police agency disclosing information to another agency about a former officer who may have been fired. A separating officer could review the official record and make his written explanation a permanent part of it. Police job applicants would have to give prospective employers a waiver allowing them to get the separation records, and the former employer would be immune from liability for revealing this.
Rep. Andy Schor (D) 'Voted Yes'
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Senate Bill 352: Require high school coach concussion training refreshers
Passed 104 to 4 in the House on October 5, 2017
To require high school coaches to get a refresher course every three years on the “concussion awareness training program” required by a 2012 law. State health officials would have to periodically review and update the training program the law required them to create. Also, to clarify that the high school "youth athletes" for whom that law requires parental waivers do not include 17 year olds in college.
Rep. Andy Schor (D) 'Voted Yes'
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House Bill 4999: Ban local food and beverage taxes
Passed 101 to 7 in the House on October 5, 2017
To prohibit local governments or authorities from imposing a tax or fee on the manufacture, distribution, wholesaling or retail sale of food for immediate consumption or non-immediate consumption. Among other things this would prohibit local officials from imposing soda taxes.
Rep. Andy Schor (D) 'Voted Yes'
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House Bill 4616: Make local governments liable for gun ban preemption violations
Passed 69 to 39 in the House on September 27, 2017
To authorize private lawsuits against a local government that violates a state preemption on local firearms ownership or use restrictions. The bill would allow plaintiffs to collect actual damages and costs if they prevail.
Rep. Andy Schor (D) 'Voted No'
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House Bill 4781: Regulate electric bicycle use of improved or forest trails
Passed 107 to 0 in the House on September 28, 2017
To regulate electric bicycles on paved, gravel or converted rail trails. Low-power, “Class 1” electric bikes would be allowed unless specifically prohibited from a trail by state or local officials. Faster and more powerful Class 2 and 3 e-bikes would be banned from trails unless specifically allowed. All electric bikes would be prohibited from non-motorized forest trails unless specifically allowed on one.
Rep. Andy Schor (D) 'Voted Yes'
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House Bill 4782: Permit and regulate electric bicycles on roads
Passed 107 to 0 in the House on September 28, 2017
To regulate and define classes of electric bicycle for use on streets and highways. “Class 1” are the lowest power bikes, and Classes 2 and 3 have more power and can go faster. The bill would ban individuals less than age 14 from using a Class 3 bike, and allow electric bicycles to be used on streets, bike-lanes and highways (not freeways) subject to the same rules and restrictions as regular bikes. Minors would have to wear a helmet.
Rep. Andy Schor (D) 'Voted Yes'
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Senate Bill 335: Revise campaign finance law to reflect Citizens United ruling
Passed 62 to 45 in the House on September 19, 2017
To revise Michigan campaign finance law provisions that violate the holding of the U.S. Supreme Court in the Citizens United case. That decision limited the power of congress and state legislatures to restrict election-related political speech by corporations, under a definition that includes non-profit groups motivated by ideological or political concerns.
The bill would authorize “independent expenditure committees” (dubbed "super-PACs") that could advocate for a candidate or ballot initiative but not contribute to or coordinate with a candidate. Candidates could solicit money for these committees, however. Committees would be subject to campaign finance filings but would not have to disclose the identity of donors, and there would be no cap on spending or contributions, which could come from corporations and unions.
Rep. Andy Schor (D) 'Voted No'
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Senate Bill 356: Impose “salespersons license” mandate on liquor industry
Passed 106 to 1 in the House on September 20, 2017
To impose licensure, regulation and legal training requirements on any person who works for a beer or wine manufacturer, wholesaler or outstate seller and is involved in selling these products to retailers. This would essentially convert a Liquor Control Commission rule into state law.
Rep. Andy Schor (D) 'Voted Yes'
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Senate Bill 73: Repeal life without parole for some cocaine sale crimes
Passed 35 to 0 in the Senate on September 20, 2017
To revise a law that authorized a mandatory life sentence for possessing or selling large quantities of cocaine or other "hard" drugs. This bill would change the law to instead authorize twice the usual drug trafficking sentence for these crimes. Senate Bill 72 would make prisoners convicted of these offenses eligible for parole after serving five years in prison.
Sen. Curtis Hertel, Jr. (D) 'Voted Yes'
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Senate Bill 335: Revise campaign finance law to reflect Citizens United ruling
Passed 23 to 12 in the Senate on September 14, 2017
To revise Michigan campaign finance law provisions that violate the holding of the U.S. Supreme Court in the Citizens United case. The decision limited the power of congress and state legislatures to restrict election-related political speech by corporations, including non-profit groups motivated by ideological or political concerns.
The bill would authorize “independent expenditure committee” (dubbed "super-PACs") that could advocate for a candidate but not contribute to or coordinate with a candidate. Committees would be subject to campaign finance filings but would not have to disclose the identity of donors, and there would be no cap on spending or contributions, which could come from corporations and unions.
Sen. Curtis Hertel, Jr. (D) 'Voted No'
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House Bill 4892: Fix and sanction city candidate filing deadline errors
Passed 37 to 0 in the Senate on September 13, 2017
To provide an exemption to state-imposed city election candidacy filing deadlines for several cities that gave prospective candidates bad information on this, causing some to miss the filing deadline for elections this November. The bill would require these cities to put these candidates on the ballot. It would also require more training and oversight for these cities' election officials, and impose $2,500 fines. Starting in 2018 cities that do this would be subject to $5,000 fine.
Sen. Curtis Hertel, Jr. (D) 'Voted Yes'
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House Bill 4716: Remove child from parents for female genital mutilation
Passed 89 to 16 in the House on September 14, 2017
To take away the parental rights of a parent who subjects a child to female genital mutilation. This would be in the same section of law that terminates parental rights for severe child abuse and molestation.
Rep. Andy Schor (D) 'Voted Yes'
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Senate Bill 409: Facilitate private home Great Lakes harbor leases
Passed 26 to 12 in the Senate on September 6, 2017
To authorize 50 year "bottomland" leases to owners of single-family homes on Great Lakes shorelines who want to create a private, non-commercial, recreational harbor formed by a breakwater. Owners would have to pay 1 percent of their home's state equalized property value in an up-front lump sum payment every 25 years. The money would go into a segregated account that pays for parts of the Department of Environmental Quality's operations.
Sen. Curtis Hertel, Jr. (D) 'Voted No'
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House Bill 4892: Correct some cities' candidate filing deadline errors
Passed 92 to 13 in the House on September 6, 2017
To provide an exemption to state-imposed city election candidacy filing deadlines for several cities that gave prospective candidates bad information on this, causing some to miss being on the ballot this November. The bill would require these cities to put these candidates on the ballot. It would also require more training and oversight for these cities' election officials, and impose $2,500 fines.
Rep. Andy Schor (D) 'Voted Yes'
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Senate Bill 242: Authorize giving state revenue to a few particular corporations
Passed 71 to 35 in the House on July 12, 2017
To authorize giving up to $200 million worth of state tax revenue to certain business owners, in particular a foreign company said to be involved in iPhone manufacture. Earlier this year the Legislature also authorized up to $1.8 billion in state payouts to companies owned by Detroit developer Dan Gilbert and possibly some others.
Rep. Andy Schor (D) 'Voted Yes'
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Senate Bill 244: Require state disclose which companies get of selective corporate subsidies
Passed 71 to 35 in the House on July 12, 2017
To require the state agency in charge of granting special corporate tax breaks and subsidies to disclose the companies that receive the cash payments authorized by Senate Bill 242 (previous bill).
The agency has claimed that some $9 billion in ongoing corporate handouts authorized by an earlier subsidy program called MEGA are exempt from disclosure, citing the same tax return confidentiality provisions that apply to regular taxpayers. (Around half of those payments are reportedly collected by the Big Three automakers.) An amendment to also disclose details of those handouts was defeated on a voice vote.
Rep. Andy Schor (D) 'Voted Yes'
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House Bill 4759: Sell Senate's former office building in Lansing
Passed 26 to 9 in the Senate on June 28, 2017
To sell the former state Senate office building in Lansing for fair market value. Last year the Senate moved into a new building acquired through a lease-purchase agreement that reportedly will cost taxpayers more than $134 million over 30 years.
Sen. Curtis Hertel, Jr. (D) 'Voted Yes'
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House Bill 4759: Sell Senate's former office building in Lansing
Passed 107 to 0 in the House on June 20, 2017
The House vote on the bill described above.
Rep. Andy Schor (D) 'Voted Yes'
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Senate Bill 274: Restrict opioid prescription quantities
Passed 36 to 1 in the Senate on June 22, 2017
To restrict the amount of opioid pain pills a doctor may prescribe to a seven day supply for acute conditions and 30 days for chronic ones.
Sen. Curtis Hertel, Jr. (D) 'Voted Yes'
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Senate Bill 160: License Polaris “Slingshot” type vehicles as a motorcycle
Passed 68 to 39 in the House on June 20, 2017
to revise the regulations on motorcycles in the state vehicle code so they also apply to “autocycles,” in particular to three wheeled vehicles like the Polaris “Slingshot.” Under current law vehicles like this happen to fit a particular definition requiring they be enclosed and have other car-like features such as windshields and wipers
Rep. Andy Schor (D) 'Voted No'
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House Bill 4355: Ban police sex with prostitutes
Passed 93 to 14 in the House on June 20, 2017
To repeal an exemption that allows police to have sex with a prostitute as part of an investigation.
Rep. Andy Schor (D) 'Voted Yes'
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House Bill 4584: Mandate giving spina bifida information to new parents
Passed 64 to 43 in the House on June 20, 2017
To mandate that a physician or other medical provider give an expecting mother or new parent specified information about spina bifida if this is detected in a fetus or newborn. Opponents were concerned that these tests produce a large number of false-positive results.
Rep. Andy Schor (D) 'Voted Yes'
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House Bill 4427: Regulate access to police body camera images
Passed 37 to 0 in the Senate on June 22, 2017
To establish that police body camera recordings taken in a private place are exempt from disclosure under the Freedom of Information Act. Individuals whose image is captured, owners of property seized or damaged in a crime and some others could still request a copy of the recordings subject to privacy exemptions. Police body camera recordings would have to be kept for at least 30 days, or longer if there is an related investigation.
Sen. Curtis Hertel, Jr. (D) 'Voted Yes'
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House Bill 4557: Authorize prison for bringing 26 cases of beer or wine into state
Passed 36 to 1 in the Senate on June 22, 2017
To authorize up to four years in prison and a $5,000 fine for bringing more than around 26 cases of wine or beer into the state without all the required licenses mandated by the state. Smaller quantities would be subject to 93 days in jail.
Sen. Curtis Hertel, Jr. (D) 'Voted Yes'
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House Bill 4213: Require court order to breathalyze minor who says no
Passed 37 to 0 in the Senate on June 22, 2017
To establish that a police officer must get a court order to get a breath test for alcohol from a minor who objects. This is not related to drunk driving or vehicles, but to enforcement of a state law that bans minors from being in possession of alcohol. Recent court cases have suggested that doing this without a court order is unconstitutional.
Sen. Curtis Hertel, Jr. (D) 'Voted Yes'
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Senate Bill 94: Accelerate vehicle trade-in “sales tax on the difference”
Passed 88 to 19 in the House on June 20, 2017
To accelerate the 24-year phase-in of a 2013 law that exempted from sales tax the value of a trade-in when buying a new vehicle. This would save buyers $28.7 million in 2021, which would gradually increase through 2028.
Rep. Andy Schor (D) 'Voted Yes'
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House Bill 4608: Exempt residential painters and decorators from licensure mandate
Passed 62 to 45 in the House on June 20, 2017
To exempt painters and decorators from the licensure mandate imposed residential maintenance and alteration contractors.
Rep. Andy Schor (D) 'Voted No'
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Senate Bill 249: Ban government discrimination against charter schools in property sales
Passed 60 to 47 in the House on June 20, 2017
To prohibit a school district or local government from refusing to sell property to a charter or private school, or taking other actions designed to keep these potential conventional public school competitors from using property for a lawful educational purpose. Prohibited actions could also include imposing deed or zoning restrictions. A number of local governments and conventional school districts have adopted such restrictions in the past
Rep. Andy Schor (D) 'Voted No'
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House Bill 4647: Overhaul school employee retirement system
Passed 55 to 52 in the House on June 15, 2017
To replace the current school pension system with one that requires more cost-sharing by new employees, and contains provisions intended to limit state management practices responsible for the $29.1 billion of unfunded liabilities in the status quo system. New employees could choose instead to receive substantial employer contributions to 401(k) accounts. If the overhauled defined benefit component is not properly funded then enrollees would have to pay half the cost of correcting this, and if underfunding exceeds specified levels this option would be closed to new hires.
Rep. Andy Schor (D) 'Voted No'
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Senate Bill 401: Overhaul school employee retirement system
Passed 21 to 17 in the Senate on June 15, 2017
The Senate vote on the identical pension reform provisions as in the House bill described above.
Sen. Curtis Hertel, Jr. (D) 'Voted No'
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Senate Bill 401: Amendment to impose unfunded school pension liability costs on charters
Failed 14 to 24 in the Senate on June 15, 2017
Curtis Hertel amendment to require charter schools to contribute to the cost of paying down the school pension system's $29.1 billion in unfunded liabilities, even though their employees do not get benefits from the system. The amendment was supported by all Democrats and by Republicans Emmons, Rocca and Schmidt.
Sen. Curtis Hertel, Jr. (D) 'Voted Yes'
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House Bill 4636: Criminalize female genital mutilation of minors
Passed 38 to 0 in the Senate on June 15, 2017
To make it a crime subject to 15 years in prison to perform a clitoridectomy, infibulation, or other female genital mutilation on person less than age 18. Claims that the procedure is required by custom or ritual would be explicitly excluded as a defense to prosecution. Related bills would ban transporting a girl for this purpose, authorize lawsuits from victims, and permanently revoke the license of a medical professional convicted of this.
Sen. Curtis Hertel, Jr. (D) 'Voted Yes'
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House Bill 4215: Repeal rule banning car running in driveway
Passed 30 to 6 in the Senate on June 13, 2017
To repeal a ban on leaving an unattended vehicle running other than on a public street or highway. This would allow warming up the car in the driveway in winter.
Sen. Curtis Hertel, Jr. (D) 'Voted Yes'
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House Bill 4613: Create process to restrict expansive court cost levies
Passed 38 to 0 in the Senate on June 15, 2017
To create a state commission to recommend changes to trial court funding in light of a Michigan Supreme Court ruling that questioned charging defendants for costs that are unrelated to their case and instead cover routine court and municipal operations. The Senate also passed House Bill 4612 to extend the current (possibly excessive) levies another three years.
Sen. Curtis Hertel, Jr. (D) 'Voted Yes'
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Senate Bill 297: Mandate electrician have proof of licensure while on job
Passed 37 to 0 in the Senate on June 8, 2017
To mandate that an electrician on a job must show a government official or inspector a photo ID and evidence of licensure status if ordered.
Sen. Curtis Hertel, Jr. (D) 'Voted Yes'
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House Bill 4457: Authorize new energy debt scheme for colleges and universities
Passed 108 to 0 in the House on June 6, 2017
To include state colleges and universities in a scheme authorized by a 2016 law for counties, which lets them contract with vendors for energy efficiency projects, and pay for these with money the projects are supposed to save (or from regular tax revenue if savings don’t appear).
Rep. Andy Schor (D) 'Voted Yes'
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House Bill 4416: Allow law-abiding citizens to carry pistol without special permit on June 7, 2017
To establish that a person who is not prohibited by law from possessing a firearm may carry a gun in public including a concealed pistol. In other words, the bill would eliminate the requirement for a law-abiding citizen to get a special permit to carry a concealed pistol.
Rep. Andy Schor (D) 'Voted No'
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House Bill 4636: Criminalize female genital mutilation of minors: on June 8, 2017
To make it a crime subject to 15 years in prison to perform a clitoridectomy, infibulation, or other female genital mutilation on person less than age 18. Claims that the procedure is required by custom or ritual would be explicitly excluded as a defense to prosecution. Related bills would ban transporting a girl for this purpose, authorize lawsuits from victims, and permanently revoke the license of a medical professional convicted of this.
Rep. Andy Schor (D) 'Voted Yes'
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House Bill 4184: Restrict local government “phone-in” voting
Passed 96 to 12 in the House on May 31, 2017
To restrict members of an elected public body casting a vote without being physically present. This would be allowed in one meeting per year per member, if the individual is absent for what other members deem to be good cause. It would also be allowed if a delay on a personnel or infrastructure issue could raise costs or liability.
Rep. Andy Schor (D) 'Voted Yes'
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House Bill 4302: Increase penalty for assaulting court and municipal employees
Passed 93 to 14 in the House on May 30, 2017
To increase from 10 to 15 years in prison the maximum penalty for an assault on a local government employee or officer that causes a serious injury. The bill was introduced after two Berrien County bailiffs were killed by handcuffed defendant who grabbed a deputy's gun while being escorted to court.
Rep. Andy Schor (D) 'Voted Yes'
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House Bill 4612: Extend expansive court cost levies
Passed 85 to 23 in the House on May 31, 2017
To extend until October 2020 a 2014 law that expanded the costs that can be imposed on an individual convicted in a criminal case so they also include some of the routine costs of operating a court. See also House Bill 4613 (next vote), which addresses the legality of these impositions.
Rep. Andy Schor (D) 'Voted Yes'
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House Bill 4580: Expand scope of MSHDA lending
Passed 103 to 4 in the House on May 31, 2017
To expand the scope of a state government housing development authority by allowing it to also participate in residential loan refinancing.
Rep. Andy Schor (D) 'Voted Yes'
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Senate Bill 249: Ban government discrimination against charter schools in property sales
Passed 25 to 13 in the Senate on May 23, 2017
To prohibit a school district or local government from refusing to sell property to a charter or private school, or taking other actions designed to keep these potential conventional public school competitors from using property for a lawful educational purpose. Prohibited actions could also include imposing deed or zoning restrictions. A number of local governments and conventional school districts have adopted such restrictions in the past
Sen. Curtis Hertel, Jr. (D) 'Voted No'
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Senate Bill 363: Let state pay more for road salt from Michigan company
Passed 36 to 2 in the Senate on May 24, 2017
To allow the state pay up to 8 percent more for road salt from the Detroit Salt Company. The bill would exempt these transactions from regular lowest-bidder contracting rules. Note: While Detroit Salt's mine is in Michigan, it is owned by a Canadian holding company.
Sen. Curtis Hertel, Jr. (D) 'Voted Yes'
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Senate Bill 122: Allow dogs in outdoor cafés
Passed 32 to 6 in the Senate on May 24, 2017
To permit a restaurant to allow customers’ dogs in outside dining areas. Under current law only seeing-eye and other service dogs are allowed in restaurants. Local governments could still choose to ban dogs.
Sen. Curtis Hertel, Jr. (D) 'Voted Yes'
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House Bill 4611: Facilitate horse race gambling by cell phone
Passed 65 to 43 in the House on May 23, 2017
To establish a new kind of horse race gambling license called a third party facilitator license, for persons who facilitate off-track betting on live and simulcast horseraces. This is said to facilitate using cell phones to place bets.
Rep. Andy Schor (D) 'Voted Yes'
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House Bill 4557: Authorize prison for bringing 26 cases of beer or wine into state
Passed 99 to 8 in the House on May 25, 2017
To authorize up to four years in prison and a $5,000 fine for bringing more than around 26 cases of wine or beer into the state without all the required licenses mandated by the state. Smaller quantities would be subject to 93 days in jail.
Rep. Andy Schor (D) 'Voted Yes'
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House Bill 4351: Exempt private aircraft owners from sales tax on parts
Passed 70 to 38 in the House on May 25, 2017
To exempt owners of private aircraft from having to pay sales tax on parts. An existing exemption benefits out of state aircraft owners (as an incentive to buy parts in Michigan). The bill would extend this to owners of private aircraft who live here. This will save aircraft owners $4 million annually, and reduce state revenue by the same amount.
Rep. Andy Schor (D) 'Voted No'
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Senate Bill 163: Authorize “Choose Life” license plate
Passed 65 to 43 in the House on May 25, 2017
To require the Secretary of State to develop a “Choose Life” license plate, with the profits from its sale spent on "life-affirming programs and projects."
Rep. Andy Schor (D) 'Voted No'
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House Bill 4427: Regulate access to police body camera images
Passed 108 to 0 in the House on May 23, 2017
To establish that police body camera recordings taken in a private place are exempt from disclosure under the Freedom of Information Act. Individuals whose image is captured, owners of property seized or damaged in a crime and some others could still request a copy of the recordings subject to privacy exemptions. Police body camera recordings would have to be kept for at least 30 days, or longer if there is an related investigation.
Rep. Andy Schor (D) 'Voted Yes'
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Senate Bill 103: Revise school truancy and chronic absence rules
Passed 28 to 9 in the Senate on May 18, 2017
To prohibit a public school from suspending or expelling a child solely for truancy or chronic absence. Senate Bill 104 would require school officials to attempt to meet with a parent, and authorize legal action if other steps don't work.
Sen. Curtis Hertel, Jr. (D) 'Voted No'
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House Bill 4205: Limit state department rulemaking authority
Passed 57 to 50 in the House on May 18, 2017
To prohibit a state department from promulgating rules more stringent than required by federal standards, unless specifically required by state statute, or if the department director determines "the preponderance of the evidence" shows a need to do so. Republican Gov. Rick Snyder has vetoed a previous version of this proposal.
Rep. Andy Schor (D) 'Voted No'
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House Joint Resolution C: Protect "electronic data and communications" from unreasonable search and seizure
Passed 107 to 0 in the House on May 17, 2017
To place before voters in the next general election a constitutional amendment to add “electronic data and communications” to the Article I provision that recognizes the right of the people to be secure from unreasonable government searches and seizures of their “person, houses, papers, and possessions.”
Rep. Andy Schor (D) 'Voted Yes'
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Senate Bill 135: David Knezek amendment, add refugee assistance spending
Failed in the Senate 12 to 26 on May 3, 2017
To spend $1 million from state tax revenue on a refugee assistance program. Michigan already has this program, which is paid for with federal money. The amendment would add state tax money also.
Sen. Curtis Hertel, Jr. (D) 'Voted Yes'
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Senate Bill 149: Coleman Young II amendment, give Detroit schools money for students who left
Failed 11 to 27 in the Senate on May 3, 2017
To allow the Detroit School District to keep getting per-pupil state money next year for students who had been enrolled in one of its schools that closed, but now go to a different school district.
Sen. Curtis Hertel, Jr. (D) 'Voted Yes'
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Senate Bill 149: Hoon-Yung Hopgood amendment, remove private school "unfunded mandate" money
Failed 13 to 25 in the Senate on May 3, 2017
To remove $2.5 million allocated to reimburse private schools for the costs they incur meeting various unfunded state mandates.
Sen. Curtis Hertel, Jr. (D) 'Voted Yes'
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Senate Bill 111: Transfer state revenue to big developers
Passed 85 to 22 in the House on May 4, 2017
To authorize giving ongoing cash subsidies to particular developers and business owners selected by state and local political appointees. Developers would get cash payments for up to 20 years based on the income tax paid by their employees and tenants. Fiscal agency projections suggest the process could transfer up to $1.8 billion state tax dollars to the developers.
Rep. Andy Schor (D) 'Voted Yes'
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Senate Bill 202: Exempt no-cash social media games from gambling ban on May 2, 2017
To establish that the state’s laws against gambling do not apply to a “social media internet game” that rewards players with either a free play or an extended period of playing time as a result of chance or uncertain event. The bill excludes “fantasy sports” games from its provisions.
Rep. Andy Schor (D) 'Voted Yes'
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Senate Bill 129: Regulate small copper mines different than big ones
Passed 74 to 35 in the House on April 25, 2017
To establish a separate regulatory regime over small native copper mining operations (meaning ones that generate less than 75,000 tons of waste rock a year to extract copper “in its elemental form”). Local governments would be preempted from imposing additional regulations and restrictions.
Rep. Andy Schor (D) 'Voted No'
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House Bill 4215: Repeal rule banning car running in driveway
Passed 77 to 30 in the House on May 2, 2017
To repeal a ban on leaving an unattended vehicle running other than on a public street or highway. This would allow warming up the car in the driveway in winter.
Rep. Andy Schor (D) 'Voted Yes'
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Senate Bill 275: Ban police sex with prostitutes
Passed 38 to 0 in the Senate on April 26, 2017
To repeal an exemption that allows police to have sex with a prostitute as part of an investigation.
Sen. Curtis Hertel, Jr. (D) 'Voted Yes'
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Senate Bill 163: Authorize “Choose Life” license plate
Passed 108 to 1 in the House on April 27, 2017
To require the Secretary of State to develop a “Choose Life” license plate, with profits from its sale spent on "life-affirming programs and projects."
Sen. Curtis Hertel, Jr. (D) 'Voted No'
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Senate Bill 160: License Polaris “Slingshot” type vehicles as a motorcycle
Passed 36 to 0 in the Senate on April 18, 2017
To revise the regulations on motorcycles in the state vehicle code so they also apply to “autocycles,” in particular to three wheeled vehicles like the Polaris “Slingshot.” Under current law vehicles like this happen to fit a particular definition requiring they be enclosed and have other car-like features such as windshields and wipers.
Sen. Curtis Hertel, Jr. (D) 'Voted Yes'
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Senate Bill 150: Require agencies disclose federal aid requests to legislature
Passed 36 to 0 in the Senate on April 18, 2017
To require state agencies that apply for any form of federal or other financial assistance to notify legislative leaders, relevant committees and the legislature’s fiscal agencies within 10 days, with the notice including any conditions or stipulations associated with receiving the assistance.
Sen. Curtis Hertel, Jr. (D) 'Voted Yes'
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Senate Bill 242: Transfer state revenue to certain business owners
Passed 32 to 5 in the Senate on March 29, 2017
To authorize giving up to $250 million of state revenue to certain developers and business owners selected by political appointees on the board of a state Strategic Fund agency. Owners of selected firms would get cash subsidies for up to 10 years equal to half or all of the income tax paid by their employees. The Senate has also passed bills authorizing another $1.8 billion in subsidies for big developers (SB 111 to 115).
Sen. Curtis Hertel, Jr. (D) 'Voted Yes'
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House Bill 4213: Require court order to breathalyze minor who says no
Passed 102 to 6 in the House on March 29, 2017
To establish that a police officer must get a court order to get a breath test for alcohol from a minor who objects. This is not related to drunk driving or vehicles, but to enforcement of a state law that bans minors from being in possession of alcohol. Recent court cases have suggested that doing this without a court order is unconstitutional.
Rep. Andy Schor (D) 'Voted Yes'
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House Bill 4070: Revise government eminent domain takings details
Passed 76 to 31 in the House on March 28, 2017
To require state agencies to pay attorney fees and court costs of private real property owners if a "governmental action" results in a loss of value and the department or agency failed to consult guidelines on government takings promulgated by the Attorney General. Also, to apply these rules on "takings" to all state departments, not just the Natural Resources, Environmental Quality, and Transportation departments. Current law defines "governmental actions" for which compensation is required as including certain permit or license denials, restrictive conditions on these and more. The state and federal constitutions requires governments to compensate owners when their property is taken.
Rep. Andy Schor (D) 'Voted Yes'
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House Bill 4315: Eliminate foreign language from graduation standards
Passed 79 to 29 in the House on March 30, 2017
To allow a student to get a high school diploma without meeting the current two-credit language requirement by instead taking a computer class or one in “visual or performing arts (with all these in a new category dubbed “21st century skills” by the sponsors of House Bill 4316, which also passed).
Rep. Andy Schor (D) 'Voted Yes'
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Senate Bill 223: Create process for disclosing police firing to other agencies
Passed 37 to 0 in the Senate on March 23, 2017
To establish a process and liability exemption for a police agency disclosing information to another agency about a former officer who may have been fired. A separating officer could review the official record and make his written explanation a permanent part of it. Police job applicants would have to give prospective employers a waiver allowing them to get the separation records, and the former employer would be immune from liability for revealing this.
Sen. Curtis Hertel, Jr. (D) 'Voted Yes'
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Senate Bill 202: Exempt no-cash social media games from gambling ban
Passed 35 to 3 in the Senate on March 22, 2017
To establish that the state’s laws against gambling do not apply to a “social media internet game” that rewards players with either a free play or an extended period of playing time as a result of chance or uncertain event. The bill excludes “fantasy sports” games from its provisions.
Sen. Curtis Hertel, Jr. (D) 'Voted Yes'
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Senate Bill 129: Regulate small copper mines different than big ones
Passed 24 to 11 in the Senate on March 9, 2017
To establish a separate and more streamlined regulatory regime over small ("native") copper mining operations.
Sen. Curtis Hertel, Jr. (D) 'Voted No'
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Senate Bill 19: Cut off parole absconders from welfare
Passed 101 to 6 in the House on March 8, 2017
To cut off cash welfare or food stamp benefits given to an individual who absconds from parole. This and the next few votes are part of a large Senate probation and parole reform package the House approved this week (except for one bill that would give subsidies to employers who hire ex-convicts).
Rep. Andy Schor (D) 'Voted Yes'
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Senate Bill 13: Cap penalties for technical parole violations
Passed 99 to 8 in the House on March 8, 2017
To cap at 30 days in jail the penalty for probationers who commit technical probation violations, except for multiple offenses.
Rep. Andy Schor (D) 'Voted Yes'
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House Bill 4208: Ban expelled legislator from running in replacement election
Passed 72 to 36 in the House on March 9, 2017
To revise a procedural detail related to when legislators are expelled or resign. The bill would require a resignation letter or expulsion resolution to explicitly cover the full balance of the term (rather than be temporary).
Rep. Andy Schor (D) 'Voted Yes'
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House Bill 4001: Cut state income tax rate by 0.2 percent
Failed 52 to 55 in the House on February 23, 2017
To cut the state income tax rate from the current 4.25 percent to 4.05 percent over two years. The tax could go down another .15 percent later but only if the state rainy day fund is allowed to exceed $1 billion. Twelve Republicans voted 'no' and one Democrat voted 'yes.'
Rep. Andy Schor (D) 'Voted No'
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Senate Bill 111: Transfer state revenue to big developers
Passed 27 to 6 in the Senate on February 22, 2017
To give a number of developers and business owners selected by state and local political appointees up to $1.8 billion state tax dollars over 20 years. The beneficiaries would be allowed to keep the state income tax payments they withhold from employee pay checks. The cost estimate comes from the Senate Fiscal Agency and applies to Senate Bills 111 to 115 together.
Sen. Curtis Hertel, Jr. (D) 'Voted Yes'
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Senate Bill 113: Let some big developers keep sales tax they collect
Passed 28 to 6 in the Senate on February 22, 2017
To allow certain developers and business owners selected by state and local political appointees to keep the sales tax they collect on retail sales. This would be a new way of giving cash subsidies to certain developers, and would reduce state revenue available for other purposes. This is part of the same proposal as Senate Bill 111 above.
Sen. Curtis Hertel, Jr. (D) 'Voted Yes'
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Senate Bill 97: Authorize facility development deals between governments and private businesses
Passed 32 to 4 in the Senate on February 23, 2017
To give state and local government agencies the power to enter joint operating arrangements with a particular developer to build a hospital or transportation facilities. The private operator would benefit from tax exemptions and its governmental partner's power to impose property taxes, borrow, take private property using eminent domain and more. The government agency involved could choose the private sector actor without necessarily having to accept the lowest bid. The projects could be proposals from a private developer.
Sen. Curtis Hertel, Jr. (D) 'Voted Yes'
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Senate Bill 40: Expand state subsidies for particular companies on state line
Passed 24 to 13 in the Senate on February 9, 2017
To let particular businesses that are near the state line, and that have been selected by political appointees on a state 'economic development' program board, to each collect up to $10 million in state business subsidies for hiring people who do not live in Michigan.
Sen. Curtis Hertel, Jr. (D) 'Voted No'
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Senate Bill 19: Cut off parole absconders from welfare
Passed 34 to 1 in the Senate on February 2, 2017
To cut off any cash welfare or food stamp benefits given to an individual who absconds from parole.
Sen. Curtis Hertel, Jr. (D) 'Voted Yes'
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To elect House leaders for the 99th Michigan Legislature, including Rep. Tom Leonard, R-Dewitt, to be Speaker of the House. Democrats selected Rep. Sam Singh of East Lansing to be the House Minority leader. Minority Leader Singh seconded the motion to make Rep. Leonard the Speaker.


Senate Resolution SR: Senators of the 99th Michigan Legislature on January 11, 2017
Names of the state Senator or Senators who represent districts in your area. This is shown for reference purposes.
Sen. Curtis Hertel, Jr. (D) 'Voted Yes'
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Showing All 176 Results in the Session        Show Fewer Results

Contact my lawmakers
Rep. Andy Schor, D-Lansing, District 68. 517-373-0826. AndySchor@house.mi.gov
Sen. Curtis Hertel, Jr., D-East Lansing, District 23. 517-373-1734. senchertel@senate.michigan.gov


SOURCE: MichiganVotes.org, a free, non-partisan website created by the Mackinac Center for Public Policy, providing concise, non-partisan, plain-English descriptions of every bill and vote in the Michigan House and Senate. Please visit www.MichiganVotes.org.

Permission to reprint this legislative summary in whole or in part is hereby granted, provided that www.MichiganVotes.org is properly cited.


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