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2019 House Bill 4236: Appropriations: Higher Education

Public Act 62 of 2019

Introduced by Rep. Scott VanSingel (R) on February 26, 2019
To provide a “template” or “place holder” for the Fiscal Year 2019-20 Higher Education budget. This bill contains no appropriations, but may be amended at a later date to include them.   Official Text and Analysis.
Referred to the House Appropriations Committee on February 26, 2019
Reported in the House on June 12, 2019
With the recommendation that the substitute (H-2) be adopted and that the bill then pass.
Amendment offered by Rep. Padma Kuppa (D) on June 13, 2019
To increase the appropriations to each university.
The amendment failed by voice vote in the House on June 13, 2019
Amendment offered by Rep. Tommy Brann (R) on June 13, 2019
To increase the appropriations to each university, and increase the amount received by universities for providing Indian tuition waivers.
The amendment failed by voice vote in the House on June 13, 2019
Amendment offered by Rep. Beau LaFave (R) on June 13, 2019
To cut university operations funding by 25 percent if the Foundation for Individual Rights in Education (FIRE) gives the school a "yellow" rating for imposing campus "speech code" and related restrictions, and a 50 percent cut if FIRE gives the school a “red” rating for restricting free speech and engaging in viewpoint discrimination. FIRE has issued “yellow” ratings on Ferris State university, Grand Valley, Michigan State, Oakland, Saginaw Valley and Wayne State universities, and to Central, Western, Northern and Eastern state universities, and Western Michigan University. All three University of Michigan campuses have been deemed “red” zones by FIRE, along with Lake Superior State University.
The amendment failed by voice vote in the House on June 13, 2019
Passed 56 to 53 in the House on June 13, 2019.
    See Who Voted "Yes" and Who Voted "No".
The House version of the fiscal year 2019-2020 Higher Education budget. This would appropriate $1.68 billion in gross spending, of which $123 million is federal money, with the rest is from state taxes and fees. The budget would provide a funding increase of just 1 percent to individual universities.
Received in the Senate on June 18, 2019
Referred to the Senate on June 18, 2019
Passed 22 to 15 in the Senate on June 18, 2019.
    See Who Voted "Yes" and Who Voted "No".
To "zero-out" all of the appropriations in the House-passed version of this budget, leaving it as just a "shell" or "placeholder." This is a procedural device used for launching negotiations over the differences between the House and Senate budgets, and eventually for negotiating a final budget between a Republican-controlled legislature and a Democratic governor.
Received in the House on June 18, 2019
Failed 1 to 108 in the House on June 19, 2019.
    See Who Voted "Yes" and Who Voted "No".
To concur with the Senate-passed version of the bill.
Moved to reconsider by Rep. Triston Cole (R) on June 19, 2019
The vote by which the bill was passed.
The motion passed by voice vote in the House on June 19, 2019
Received in the House on June 19, 2019
Received in the House on September 17, 2019
Received in the Senate on September 24, 2019
Passed 20 to 18 in the Senate on September 24, 2019.
    See Who Voted "Yes" and Who Voted "No".
The House-Senate conference report for the Fiscal Year 2019-2020 Higher Education budget. This would appropriate $1.685 billion in gross spending, compared to $1.669 billion enrolled the previous year. Some $128 million of this budget is federal money. Part of each school's funding would be contingent on not increasing tuition and fees more than 4.4% or $587, whichever is greater.
Received in the House on September 24, 2019
Signed with line-item veto by Gov. Gretchen Whitmer on September 30, 2019
Received in the House on October 2, 2019
Referred to the House Appropriations Committee on October 8, 2019

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