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2015 Senate Bill 248: Expand auto theft authority; limit injured motorist hospital prices
Introduced by Sen. Joe Hune (R) on March 26, 2015
To replace the Michigan Catastrophic Claims Association (MCCA) with a new state authority that would provide reinsurance to individual auto insurance companies for personal injury claim amounts that exceed above $545,000 per incident. The MCCA is a private entity created by the original no-fault law, which also mandated that all drivers have unlimited personal injury protection coverage (PIP). The bill would also place price controls on attendant care and other medical services provided to injured individuals under this PIP, and expand the duties of a state automobile theft prevention authority to include insurance fraud related PIP benefits, paid for by $21 million in assessments (taxes) on insurers.   Official Text and Analysis.
Referred to the Senate Insurance Committee on March 26, 2015
Reported in the Senate on April 16, 2015
With the recommendation that the substitute (S-2) be adopted and that the bill then pass.
Amendment offered by Sen. Coleman Young, II (D) on April 16, 2015
To mandate that auto insurance companies cut their priced by at least 20 percent.
The amendment failed 12 to 26 in the Senate on April 16, 2015.
    See Who Voted "Yes" and Who Voted "No".
Amendment offered by Sen. Coleman Young, II (D) on April 16, 2015
To mandate that auto insurance companies cut their priced by at least 40 percent.
The amendment failed 8 to 28 in the Senate on April 16, 2015.
    See Who Voted "Yes" and Who Voted "No".
Amendment offered by Sen. Coleman Young, II (D) on April 16, 2015
To mandate that auto insurance companies cut their priced by at least 30 percent.
The amendment failed 11 to 27 in the Senate on April 16, 2015.
    See Who Voted "Yes" and Who Voted "No".
Amendment offered by Sen. Coleman Young, II (D) on April 16, 2015
To mandate that auto insurance companies cut their priced by at least 20 percent.
The amendment failed 13 to 25 in the Senate on April 16, 2015.
    See Who Voted "Yes" and Who Voted "No".
Amendment offered by Sen. Coleman Young, II (D) on April 16, 2015
To mandate that auto insurance companies cut their priced by at least 10 percent.
The amendment failed 13 to 25 in the Senate on April 16, 2015.
    See Who Voted "Yes" and Who Voted "No".
Amendment offered by Sen. Coleman Young, II (D) on April 16, 2015
To mandate that auto insurance companies cut their priced by at least 5 percent.
The amendment failed 17 to 21 in the Senate on April 16, 2015.
    See Who Voted "Yes" and Who Voted "No".
Amendment offered by Sen. Steve Bieda (D) on April 16, 2015
To prohibit insurers from spending more than 15 percent of the personal injury coverage premium revenue on expenses that are not insurance claims.
The amendment failed 13 to 25 in the Senate on April 16, 2015.
    See Who Voted "Yes" and Who Voted "No".
Amendment offered by Sen. Steve Bieda (D) on April 16, 2015
To make the MCCA and its successor organization subject to the state's open records law. The Senate-passed version of the bill does subject the successor organization to this law.
The amendment failed 15 to 23 in the Senate on April 16, 2015.
    See Who Voted "Yes" and Who Voted "No".
Amendment offered by Sen. Morris Hood, III (D) on April 16, 2015
To prohibit auto insurance policies from basing premium prices on a person’s credit history or lack of credit history.
The amendment failed 11 to 27 in the Senate on April 16, 2015.
    See Who Voted "Yes" and Who Voted "No".
Amendment offered by Sen. Bert Johnson (D) on April 16, 2015
To prohibit auto insurance policies from basing premium prices on a person’s education level.
The amendment failed 10 to 28 in the Senate on April 16, 2015.
    See Who Voted "Yes" and Who Voted "No".
Amendment offered by Sen. Curtis Hertel, Jr. (D) on April 16, 2015
To require that when the MCCA is finally shut down after all its liabilities have been extinguished any leftover money must be rebated to auto insurance customers.
The amendment failed 11 to 27 in the Senate on April 16, 2015.
    See Who Voted "Yes" and Who Voted "No".
Amendment offered by Sen. Vincent Gregory (D) on April 16, 2015
To strip out a modest appropriation in the bill, which among other things makes the bill not subject to referendum under a 2001 Supreme Court ruling.
The amendment failed 16 to 22 in the Senate on April 16, 2015.
    See Who Voted "Yes" and Who Voted "No".
Amendment offered by Sen. David Knezek (D) on April 16, 2015
To require insurance companies to testify before the legislature if there is more than a 15 percent variance in premium prices between customers in a particular zip code and the state average.
The amendment failed 13 to 25 in the Senate on April 16, 2015.
    See Who Voted "Yes" and Who Voted "No".
Amendment offered by Sen. Jim Ananich (D) on April 16, 2015
To remove a provision that prohibits medical providers from charging an auto insurer more than the average price the provider charges regular customers for a medical service.
The amendment failed 14 to 24 in the Senate on April 16, 2015.
    See Who Voted "Yes" and Who Voted "No".
Amendment offered by Sen. Rebekah Warren (D) on April 16, 2015
To eliminate price controls the bill would establish for personal attendant care of injured individuals.
The amendment failed 13 to 25 in the Senate on April 16, 2015.
    See Who Voted "Yes" and Who Voted "No".
Amendment offered by Sen. Jim Ananich (D) on April 16, 2015
To establish that the provisions of the bill are prospective only.
The amendment failed 13 to 25 in the Senate on April 16, 2015.
    See Who Voted "Yes" and Who Voted "No".
Passed 21 to 17 in the Senate on April 16, 2015.
    See Who Voted "Yes" and Who Voted "No".
To replace the Michigan Catastrophic Claims Association (MCCA) with a new state authority that would provide reinsurance to individual auto insurance companies for personal injury claim amounts that exceed above $545,000 per incident. The MCCA is a private entity created by the original no-fault law, which also mandated that all drivers have unlimited personal injury protection coverage (PIP). The bill would place some price controls on medical services and attendant care provided to injured individuals under this PIP, with monthly copays on the latter. It would also expand the duties of a state automobile theft prevention authority to include insurance fraud related PIP benefits, paid for by $21 million in assessments (taxes) on insurers .
Received in the House on April 16, 2015
Referred to the House Insurance Committee on April 16, 2015
Reported in the House on April 23, 2015
With the recommendation that the substitute (H-3) be adopted and that the bill then pass.

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