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2010 House Bill 5837: Exempt certain “cottage food operations” from licensure

Public Act 113 of 2010

Introduced by Rep. Pam Byrnes (D) on February 17, 2010
To exempt a “cottage food operation,” defined as a person who annually produces or packages less than $15,000 worth of “non-potentially hazardous food” in a kitchen of that person's primary domestic residence, from the licensure and regulation mandates that apply to regular commercial food producers. “Non-potentially hazardous food” would be defined as “baked goods, jams, jellies, candy, snack food, cereal, granola, dry mixes, vinegar, and dried herbs. It would not include home-canned low-acid or acidified vegetables, home-canned salsa, or home-canned food; food service items; ready-to-eat meals, meat, sandwiches, cheese, or custard pies; garlic in oil; food that requires temperature control for safety; and bottled water, home-produced ice products, and other beverages and products”.   Official Text and Analysis.
Referred to the House Agriculture Committee on February 17, 2010
Reported in the House on June 9, 2010
With the recommendation that the substitute (H-1) be adopted and that the bill then pass.
Substitute offered in the House on June 15, 2010
To replace the previous version of the bill with one that revises various details, and also divides the provisions between this bill and House Bills 5280 and 5843.
The substitute passed by voice vote in the House on June 15, 2010
To exempt a “cottage food operation,” defined as a person who annually produces or packages less than $15,000 worth of “non-potentially hazardous food” in a kitchen of that person's primary domestic residence, from the licensure and regulation mandates that apply to regular commercial food producers. “Non-potentially hazardous food” would be defined as “baked goods, jams, jellies, candy, snack food, cereal, granola, dry mixes, vinegar, and dried herbs. It would not include food that requires temperature control for safety; meat and poultry products; salsa; milk products; bottled water and other beverages; home-produced ice products and more.
Received in the Senate on June 16, 2010
Referred to the Senate Agriculture and Bioeconomy Committee on June 16, 2010
Reported in the Senate on July 1, 2010
With the recommendation that the bill pass.
To exempt a “cottage food operation,” defined as a person who annually produces or packages less than $15,000 worth of “non-potentially hazardous food” in a kitchen of that person's primary domestic residence, from the licensure and regulation mandates that apply to regular commercial food producers. See also House 5280, which whould impose a new labeling mandate on these products, similar to what is required on regular commercial food labels.
Signed by Gov. Jennifer Granholm on July 12, 2010

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