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2006 House Bill 6213: Revise "minimum wage" hike to reverse unintended consequences

Public Act 373 of 2006

Introduced by Rep. Bill Huizenga (R) on June 15, 2006
To undo provisions in recent changes to the state law that makes it unlawful to employ a worker for less than a certain dollar amount set by the government ("minimum wage"), so as to maintain the status quo with respect to certain exemptions to overtime pay requirements. An unintended consequence of the recent changes was to apply the overtime pay requirement (one-and-one half times the regular hourly wage rate) to many professions that had previously been exempt, because the norm in them is fewer shifts with longer hours per shift (hospital nurses, long-haul truckers and auto salespersons have been cited as examples).   Official Text and Analysis.
Referred to the House Commerce Committee on June 15, 2006
Reported in the House on June 20, 2006
Without amendment and with the recommendation that the bill pass.
Amendment offered by Rep. Andy Meisner (D) on June 20, 2006
To tie-bar the bill to House Bill 4709, meaning this bill cannot become law unless that one does also. HB 4709 would expand the overtime pay law to “executive, administrative or professional” employees who make less than $100,000 and do not supervise at least five other workers.
The amendment failed 49 to 55 in the House on June 20, 2006.
    See Who Voted "Yes" and Who Voted "No".
Amendment offered by Rep. Andy Meisner (D) on June 20, 2006
To tie-bar the bill to House Bill 4739, meaning this bill cannot become law unless that one does also. HB 4739 would reverse recent Supreme Court decisions which defined "serious impairment" in the no fault auto insurance law.
The amendment failed 49 to 55 in the House on June 20, 2006.
    See Who Voted "Yes" and Who Voted "No".
Amendment offered by Rep. Gary McDowell (D) on June 20, 2006
To tie-bar the bill to Senate Bill 185, meaning this bill cannot become law unless that one does also. SB 185 would increase the maximum length of time an individual may receive unemployment insurance benefits.
The amendment failed 53 to 50 in the House on June 20, 2006.
    See Who Voted "Yes" and Who Voted "No".
Motion by Rep. Chris Ward (R) on June 20, 2006
To give the bill immediate effect.
The motion failed 57 to 49 in the House on June 20, 2006.
    See Who Voted "Yes" and Who Voted "No".
Received in the Senate on June 21, 2006
Referred to the Senate Commerce and Labor Committee on June 21, 2006
Motion by Sen. Beverly Hammerstrom (R) on June 27, 2006
To discharge the Committee on Commerce and Labor from further consideration of the bill, and bring it to the full Senate for a vote.
The motion passed 21 to 16 in the Senate on June 27, 2006.
    See Who Voted "Yes" and Who Voted "No".
Amendment offered by Sen. Tom George (R) on June 27, 2006
To state explicitly that any right to overtime compensation enjoyed by employees prior to passage of the recent changes to the mandatory minimum wage law would not be repealed by this bill.
The amendment passed 37 to 0 in the Senate on June 27, 2006.
    See Who Voted "Yes" and Who Voted "No".
Amendment offered by Sen. Mark Schauer (D) on June 27, 2006
To tie-bar the bill to House Bill 4709, meaning this bill cannot become law unless that one does also. HB 4709 would establish that an employee paid less than $100,000 a year is not considered an “executive, administrative or professional” exempt from state overtime pay requirements unless he or she supervises at least five other employees.
The amendment failed 16 to 21 in the Senate on June 27, 2006.
    See Who Voted "Yes" and Who Voted "No".
Motion by Sen. Beverly Hammerstrom (R) on June 27, 2006
To give the bill immediate effect.
The motion failed 21 to 16 in the Senate on June 27, 2006.
    See Who Voted "Yes" and Who Voted "No".
Received in the House on June 27, 2006
The bill was returned to the House so that the nine Democrats who had cosponsored it could be permitted to remove their names.
To concur with the Senate-passed version of the bill.
Received in the Senate on June 29, 2006
Amendment offered by Sen. Ken Sikkema (R) on August 30, 2006
To tie-bar the bill to Senate Bill 1364 and House Bill 6213, meaning this bill cannot become law unless those ones do also. These are the other bills in the "deal" made to get Democrats to approve immediate effect on this minimum wage "clean-up" bill. Those bills create a state earned income tax credit (EITC) for low income workers, and a lower mandated private sector minimum wage for workers under the age of 18.
The amendment passed by voice vote in the Senate on August 30, 2006
Amendment offered by Sen. Bob Emerson (D) and Sen. Ken Sikkema (R) on August 30, 2006
To expand the state law that makes it unlawful to employ a worker for less than a certain dollar amount set by the government ("minimum wage") to include home health workers and non-live in domestic child care workers (defined to exclude occasional babysitters).
The amendment passed by voice vote in the Senate on August 30, 2006
Amendment offered by Sen. Tom George (R) on August 30, 2006
To clarify that the mandated overtime requirement revisions do not have the effect of excluding any particular industries or services which had been covered by the previous law. In other words, the status quo in this regard would not be changed.
The amendment passed by voice vote in the Senate on August 30, 2006
To adopt a private sector overtime law "clean up" bill that expands the mandate to employers of home health workers and non-live in domestic child care workers. As part of a compromise made to get Democrats to approve immediate effect on the overtime "clean-up" provisions, the bill was linked to Senate Bill 453, which creates a state earned income tax credit (EITC) for low income workers, and Senate Bill 1364, which imposes a lower mandated private sector minimum wage for workers under the age of 18 create a state earned income tax credit (EITC) for low income workers, and a lower mandated private sector minimum wage for workers under the age of 18..
Received in the House on August 30, 2006
To adopt a private sector overtime law "clean up" bill that expands the mandate to employers of home health workers and non-live in domestic child care workers. As part of a compromise made to get Democrats to approve immediate effect on the overtime "clean-up" provisions, the bill was linked to Senate Bill 453, which creates a state earned income tax credit (EITC) for low income workers, and Senate Bill 1364, which imposes a lower mandated private sector minimum wage for workers under the age of 18.
Signed by Gov. Jennifer Granholm on September 22, 2006

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