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2009 House Bill 4394: Ban texting while driving

Public Act 60 of 2010

Introduced by Rep. Lee Gonzales (D) on February 24, 2009
To prohibit driving while using a two-way electronic device including a cell phone to send text messages. The violation would be a “secondary” one, meaning that a driver could not be stopped just for this, but if stopped for some other violation this one could be tacked on.   Official Text and Analysis.
Referred to the House Transportation Committee on February 24, 2009
Reported in the House on October 22, 2009
With the recommendation that the substitute (H-3) be adopted and that the bill then pass.
Substitute offered in the House on December 8, 2009
To replace the previous version of the bill with one that revises various details, but does not change its substance. This version was subsequently superseded by another substitute with more minor changes.
The substitute failed by voice vote in the House on December 8, 2009
Substitute offered by Rep. Andrew Kandrevas (D) on December 8, 2009
To replace the previous version of the bill with one that revises details but does not change the substance of the bill as previously described.
The substitute passed by voice vote in the House on December 8, 2009
Received in the Senate on December 9, 2009
Referred to the Senate Transportation Committee on December 9, 2009
Reported in the Senate on February 24, 2010
With the recommendation that the substitute (S-4) be adopted and that the bill then pass.
Substitute offered in the Senate on March 18, 2010
To replace the previous version of the bill with one that revises details but does not change the substance as previously described.
The substitute passed by voice vote in the Senate on March 18, 2010
Amendment offered by Sen. Jud Gilbert (R) on March 25, 2010
To make the proposed violation a "primary offense," meaning that a driver could be stopped just for this.
The amendment passed by voice vote in the Senate on March 25, 2010
Passed 28 to 10 in the Senate on March 25, 2010.
    See Who Voted "Yes" and Who Voted "No".
To prohibit driving while using a two-way electronic device including a cell phone to send text messages. The violation would be a “primary” one, meaning that a driver could be pulled over and stopped just for this.
Received in the House on March 25, 2010
Amendment offered by Rep. Kenneth Horn (R) on April 20, 2010
To revert the bill to the original House-passed version, which makes "texting while driving" a secondary offence (a driver cannot get pulled over just for this).
The amendment failed by voice vote in the House on April 20, 2010
Amendment offered by Rep. Tom McMillin (R) on April 20, 2010
To define texting as "entering or sending not more than 10 characters," which would clarify that a person can't be ticketed for dialing a phone number.
The amendment failed by voice vote in the House on April 20, 2010
Amendment offered by Rep. Justin Amash (R) on April 20, 2010
To prohibit law enforcement agencies from obtaining a person's phone records to use as evidence in a "texting while driving" prosecution.
The amendment failed by voice vote in the House on April 20, 2010
Amendment offered by Rep. Tom McMillin (R) on April 20, 2010
To revert the bill to the original House-passed version, which makes "texting while driving" a secondary offence (a driver cannot get pulled over just for this).
The amendment failed by voice vote in the House on April 20, 2010
Passed 74 to 33 in the House on April 20, 2010.
    See Who Voted "Yes" and Who Voted "No".
To concur with the Senate-passed version of the bill, which makes "texting while driving" a primary offence (a driver can get pulled over just for this).
Signed by Gov. Jennifer Granholm on April 30, 2010

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