Legislation watch

Search all years.

2019 Senate Bill 149: Appropriations: Department of Transportation

Public Act 66 of 2019

Introduced by Sen. Wayne Schmidt (R) on February 28, 2019
To provide a “template” or “place holder” for the Fiscal Year 2019-20 Department of Transportation budget. This bill contains no appropriations, but may be amended at a later date to include them.   Official Text and Analysis.
Referred to the Senate Appropriations Committee on February 28, 2019
Reported in the Senate on May 7, 2019
With the recommendation that the substitute (S-2) be adopted and that the bill then pass.
Amendment offered by Sen. Adam Hollier (D) on May 15, 2019
To require the Department of Transportation to give the legislature an annual estimate of how much would be needed to get 90 percent of the trunkline road system into good or fair condition.
The amendment failed 16 to 22 in the Senate on May 15, 2019.
    See Who Voted "Yes" and Who Voted "No".
Amendment offered by Sen. Stephanie Chang (D) on May 15, 2019
To earmark $12 million to a Van Horn road railroad grade separation project.
The amendment failed 16 to 22 in the Senate on May 15, 2019.
    See Who Voted "Yes" and Who Voted "No".
Amendment offered by Sen. Rosemary Bayer (D) on May 15, 2019
To spend $170,000 to purchase a downtown trolley and develop a fixed route between Oxford and Orion.
The amendment failed 16 to 22 in the Senate on May 15, 2019.
    See Who Voted "Yes" and Who Voted "No".
Passed 22 to 16 in the Senate on May 15, 2019.
    See Who Voted "Yes" and Who Voted "No".
The Senate version of the Department of Transportation budget for the fiscal year beginning Oct. 1, 2019. This would appropriate $5.130 billion in gross spending, compared to $4.843 billion the previous year, of which $1.342 billion is federal money. The budget does not include any spending that would be funded by a potential 45 cent per gallon gas tax increase proposed by Gov. Whitmer, but does accelerate into the FY 2019-2020 road repair budget (instead of in the following year) an annual $600 million income tax revenue earmark that was authorized in a 2015 road funding package that also increased motor fuel and vehicle registration taxes.
Received in the House on May 15, 2019
Referred to the House Appropriations Committee on May 15, 2019
Reported in the House on June 19, 2019
With the recommendation that the substitute (H-1) be adopted and that the bill then pass.
Passed 57 to 52 in the House on June 19, 2019.
    See Who Voted "Yes" and Who Voted "No".
To send the bill back to the Senate as just a "shell" or "placeholder" budget with no actual appropriations. This is a procedural device used for launching negotiations over the differences between the House and Senate budgets, and eventually for negotiating a final budget between a Republican-controlled legislature and a Democratic governor.
Received in the Senate on June 20, 2019
Failed 0 to 37 in the Senate on June 20, 2019.
    See Who Voted "Yes" and Who Voted "No".
To concur with the House-passed version of the bill.
Received in the Senate on September 24, 2019
Passed 22 to 16 in the Senate on September 24, 2019.
    See Who Voted "Yes" and Who Voted "No".
The House-Senate conference report for the Fiscal Year 2019-2020 Department of Transportation budget. This would appropriate $5.386 billion in gross spending, compared to $4.843 billion enrolled the previous year. Some $1.252 billion of this budget is federal money. The legislature did not enact a 45 cent gas per gallon gas tax increase proposed by Gov. Gretchen Whitmer (which was never introduced as legislation), but did include $468 million in state income tax revenue earmarked to roads by Republican majorities in the two previous legislatures. The current majority also directed $400 million in additional state revenue dollars generated by a growing economy to this budget for road repairs.
Received in the House on September 24, 2019
Signed with line-item veto by Gov. Gretchen Whitmer on September 29, 2019
Received in the Senate on October 2, 2019

Comments