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2017 House Bill 4991: Wrongful imprisonment compensation (plus earmarks for roads and cleanups added)

Public Act 588 of 2018

Introduced by Rep. Chris Afendoulis (R) and Rep. Martin Howrylak (R) on September 19, 2017
To not include compensation received for wrongful imprisonment in income caps that limit the principle residence property tax credit that homeowners can claim on their state income tax. In other words, a person who gets this money would still be eligible for the tax credit if the money pushed him or her over the income cap. This wrongful imprisonment compensation is exempt from federal income tax (and so from state income tax also).   Official Text and Analysis.
Referred to the House Tax Policy Committee on September 19, 2017
Reported in the House on February 14, 2018
With the recommendation that the substitute (H-1) be adopted and that the bill then pass.
Substitute offered by Rep. Martin Howrylak (R) on May 1, 2018
The substitute passed by voice vote in the House on May 1, 2018
Received in the Senate on May 3, 2018
Referred to the Senate Finance Committee on May 3, 2018
Passed 26 to 12 in the Senate on December 20, 2018.
    See Who Voted "Yes" and Who Voted "No".
To earmark a portion of state income tax revenue that would otherwise go to the School Aid Fund to road repairs and environmental cleanups. The bill was passed in expectation of increased revenue from imposing sales tax on internet purchases will mean no net reduction in future school funding, although the amount of extra money it would get would be reduced. These provisions were attached to the original bill, which revises the tax treatment of compensation received for wrongful imprisonment so that it would not make recipients ineligible for a housing expenses income tax credit.
Received in the House on December 20, 2018
Amendment offered by Rep. Jeff Yaroch (R) on December 21, 2018
To revise details of conditions on the proposed revenue earmarks.
The amendment passed by voice vote in the House on December 21, 2018
Received in the Senate on December 21, 2018
Passed 26 to 12 in the Senate on December 21, 2018.
    See Who Voted "Yes" and Who Voted "No".
To concur with the House-passed version of the bill.
Signed by Gov. Rick Snyder on December 28, 2018

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