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2006 Senate Bill 1124: Mandate high school graduation requirements

Public Act 124 of 2006

Introduced by Sen. Wayne Kuipers R- on March 9, 2006
To prescribe high school graduation requirements for public schools and charter schools. These would include four credits (or year-long courses) each in English and mathematics (including Algebra I, Algebra II and Geometry); three each in science and social science (including biology and chemistry or physics); two in a foreign language (beginning with students entering ninth grade in 2009); one in health and physical education; one in fine arts or music; and at least one in certain electives specified in the bill. Also, one course or "learning experience" that was presented online. Alternatively, an 11th grade student who has completed two-and-one-half years of this curriculum could request a custom "individualized learning plan." Student could "test out" of certain requirements (for example, a bi-lingual student). Middle school students could take some mandated classes to get a "head start" on the requirements. Schools would be required to have these standards in place beginning with students who graduate in enter ninth grade beginning in 2007, or to have a timetable in place for adopting them.   Official Text and Analysis.
Referred to the Senate Education Committee on March 9, 2006
Reported in the Senate on March 14, 2006
With the recommendation that the substitute (S-1) be adopted and that the bill then pass.
Substitute offered in the Senate on March 15, 2006
To replace the previous version of the bill with one that makes "earth science" an elective rather a required course, clarifies the details of when math classes must be taken, and makes many other detail changes that do not change the substance of the bill as previously described.
The substitute passed by voice vote in the Senate on March 15, 2006
Amendment offered by Sen. Martha G. Scott D- on March 16, 2006
To tie-bar the bill to Senate Bill 4, meaning this bill cannot become law unless that one does also. SB 4 would require compulsory school attendance for children up to age 18, instead of age 16 as is currently required.
The amendment failed by voice vote in the Senate on March 16, 2006
Amendment offered by Sen. Nancy Cassis R- on March 16, 2006
To allow a student to fulfill the Algebra 2 requirement with an "alternative approach" if the math teacher and a school guidance counselor agree.
The amendment passed 19 to 17 in the Senate on March 16, 2006.
    See Who Voted "Yes" and Who Voted "No".
Amendment offered by Sen. Nancy Cassis R- on March 16, 2006
To require schools to report on the number of students they have allowed to fulfill the Algebra 2 requirement with an "alternative approach".
The amendment passed by voice vote in the Senate on March 16, 2006
Amendment offered by Sen. Michael Switalski D- on March 16, 2006
To eliminate the bill's proposed requirement to complete two years of a foreign language in order to graduate from high school.
The amendment failed by voice vote in the Senate on March 16, 2006
Amendment offered by Sen. Michael Switalski D- on March 16, 2006
To add astronomy to the list of recommended elective courses proposed by the bill.
The amendment passed by voice vote in the Senate on March 16, 2006
Amendment offered by Sen. Michael Switalski D- on March 16, 2006
To eliminate the bill's proposed requirement to complete two and one-half years of the mandated curriculum before being eligible to request an "individualized learning plan," and instead allow any student age 16 or older to do so.
The amendment failed by voice vote in the Senate on March 16, 2006
To prescribe high school graduation requirements for public schools and charter schools. These would include four credits (or year-long courses) each in English and mathematics (including Algebra I, Algebra II and Geometry); three each in science and social science (including biology and chemistry or physics); two in a foreign language (beginning with students entering ninth grade in 2009); one in health and physical education; one in fine arts or music; and at least one in certain electives specified in the bill. Also, one course or "learning experience" that was presented online. Alternatively, an 11th grade student who has completed two-and-one-half years of this curriculum could request a custom "individualized learning plan" instead of completing the math and science credits. Students could "test out" of certain requirements (for example, a bi-lingual student). Middle school students could take some mandated classes to get a "head start" on the requirements. Schools would be required to have these standards in place beginning with students who graduate in enter ninth grade beginning in 2007, or to have a timetable in place for adopting them.
Received in the House on March 16, 2006
Substitute offered by Rep. Brian Palmer R- on March 22, 2006
To replace the previous version of the bill with one that does not contain the Senate-passed foreign language requirement.
The substitute passed by voice vote in the House on March 22, 2006
To prescribe high school graduation requirements for public schools and charter schools. These would include four credits (or year-long courses) each in English and mathematics (including Algebra I, Algebra II and Geometry); three each in science and social science (including biology and chemistry or physics); one in health and physical education; one in fine arts or music; and one in certain electives, but none in foreign language. The vote sets up a negotiation between the House and Senate over the slightly different requirements proposed by this bill and House Bill 5606.
Received in the Senate on March 23, 2006
To concur with a House-passed version of the bill. The vote sends the bill to a House-Senate conference committee to work out the differences.
Received in the Senate on March 28, 2006
To adopt a House-Senate conference committee compromise prescribing high school graduation requirements for public schools and charter schools, beginning with the class graduating in 2011. These would include four year-long courses each in English and mathematics (including Algebra I, Algebra II and Geometry); three each in science and social science (including biology and chemistry or physics); one in health and physical education; one in fine arts or music; and at least one in certain electives specified in the bill. Beginning with the class of 2016, two years of foreign language would be required sometime during the student's K-12 career. Students could "test-out" of any of the requirements. The Department of Education would be required to develop content expectations for each subject. At least one semester of Algebra II would be required for all, but struggling students could then enter an alternative math class. The provisions are divided between this bill and House Bill 5606.
Received in the House on March 28, 2006
Motion by Rep. Chris Ward R- on March 30, 2006
To give the bill immediate effect.
The motion passed 95 to 11 in the House on March 30, 2006.
    See Who Voted "Yes" and Who Voted "No".
Signed by Gov. Jennifer Granholm on April 20, 2006