Checkmark
Legislation watch

Search all years.

2003 House Bill 5216

Public Act 316 of 2003

Introduced by Rep. Steve Tobocman (D) on October 30, 2003
To allow cities to enforce ordinances designated as "quality of life violations" through an alternative adjudication system which would bypass clogged district courts (such as the 36th district which serves Detroit). A city could establish an administrative hearings bureau, which would not be bound by the formal rules of evidence would that apply in criminal courts. The bureau could not impose jail sentences, but could impose civil fines of up to $10,000. Rulings by the bureau could be appealed to district court. Quality of life violations could include violations of local zoning laws, building or construction codes, building or property maintenance codes, fire prevention codes, illegal dumping and solid waste disposal laws, noxious weeds ordinances, and local laws dealing with vehicle abandonment, inoperative vehicles, and vehicle impoundment. This is part of a legislative package comprised of House Bills 5216 to 5220, 5223, and 5224.   Official Text and Analysis.
Referred to the House Judiciary Committee on October 30, 2003
Reported in the House on November 6, 2003
With the recommendation that the substitute (H-1) be adopted and that the bill then pass.
Amendment offered by Rep. Jim Howell (R) on December 2, 2003
To include and municipal vehicle licensing as one of the violations covered by the proposed bureaus.
The amendment passed by voice vote in the House on December 2, 2003
Amendment offered by Rep. Jim Howell (R) on December 2, 2003
To prohibit cities with rental housing inspection programs from issuing citations under the proposed alternative system to landlords during inspections, unless the landlord is first given a written correction notice and a reasonable opportunity to correct the violation, or the violation represents an immediate health and safety emergency.
The amendment passed by voice vote in the House on December 2, 2003
Substitute offered in the House on December 2, 2003
To replace the previous version of the bill with one which eliminates the enforcement of construction codes from the proposed alternative adjudication system.
The substitute passed by voice vote in the House on December 2, 2003
Substitute offered by Rep. Jim Howell (R) on December 2, 2003
To replace the previous version of the bill with one which replaces references to “quality of life” violations with the term “blight violations”.
The substitute passed by voice vote in the House on December 2, 2003
Amendment offered by Rep. Jim Howell (R) on December 2, 2003
To clarify the provision governing appointment of hearing officers in the proposed bureaus.
The amendment passed by voice vote in the House on December 2, 2003
Amendment offered by Rep. Ken Bradstreet (R) on December 2, 2003
To narrow the scope of the bill to only allow the alternative adjudication system in cities with a population of 7,500 or more.
The amendment passed by voice vote in the House on December 2, 2003
To allow cities to enforce ordinances designated as "blight violations" through an alternative adjudication system which would bypass clogged district courts (such as the 36th district which serves Detroit). A city could establish an administrative hearings bureau, which would not be bound by the formal rules of evidence would that apply in criminal courts. The bureau could not impose jail sentences, but could impose civil fines of up to $10,000. Rulings by the bureau could be appealed to district court. Blight violations could include violations of local zoning laws, building or property maintenance codes, fire prevention codes, illegal dumping and solid waste disposal laws, noxious weeds ordinances, and local laws dealing with vehicle abandonment, inoperative vehicles, and vehicle impoundment. This is part of a legislative package comprised of House Bills 5216 to 5220, 5223, and 5224.
Received in the Senate on December 4, 2003
Referred to the Senate Judiciary Committee on December 4, 2003
Reported in the Senate on December 11, 2003
With the recommendation that the substitute (S-1) be adopted and that the bill then pass.
Substitute offered in the Senate on December 16, 2003
To replace the previous version of the bill with one which establishes that the bill would apply to cities with a population of at least 7,500, or for Wayne County a population of at least 3,300, and which incorporates technical changes that do not affect the substance of the bill as previously described. The substitute also clarifies that a person could not be made subject to both a blight citation and civil prosecution for the same offence.
The substitute passed by voice vote in the Senate on December 16, 2003
To allow cities above a certain size to enforce ordinances designated as "blight violations" through an alternative adjudication system which would bypass clogged district courts (such as the 36th district which serves Detroit). A city could establish an administrative hearings bureau, which would not be bound by the formal rules of evidence would that apply in criminal courts. The bureau could not impose jail sentences, but could impose civil fines of up to $10,000. Rulings by the bureau could be appealed to district court. Blight violations could include violations of local zoning laws, building or property maintenance codes, fire prevention codes, illegal dumping and solid waste disposal laws, noxious weeds ordinances, and local laws dealing with vehicle abandonment, inoperative vehicles, and vehicle impoundment. This is part of a legislative package comprised of House Bills 5216 to 5220, 5223, and 5224.
Received in the House on December 17, 2003
To concur with the Senate-passed version of the bill.
Signed by Gov. Jennifer Granholm on January 8, 2004

Comments