Legislation watch

Search all years.

2017 Senate Bill 663: Authorize “emotional support animal” certification
Introduced by Sen. Peter MacGregor (R) on November 28, 2017
To expand a law that authorizes criminal penalties for falsely claiming to have a disability that makes a person eligible to have a “certified” service animal, so that it also applies to a bona fide “emotional support animal." The bill would establish procedures and requirements for a person with a disability to get an emotional support animal certification, which among other things would require a health care professional who has been treating the individual for at least six months to attest to the validity of the need. This is all related to a 2015 law that requires the Department of Civil Rights to create an identification card, tag, and vest for a service animal (like a seeing-eye dog), which permits the owner to bring the animal into public accommodations where dogs are usually not allowed.   Official Text and Analysis.
Referred to the Senate Local Government Committee on November 28, 2017
Reported in the Senate on December 12, 2018
With the recommendation that the bill pass.
Passed 36 to 1 in the Senate on December 13, 2018.
    See Who Voted "Yes" and Who Voted "No".
(same description)
To expand a law that authorizes criminal penalties for falsely claiming to have a disability that makes a person eligible to have a “certified” service animal, so that it also applies to a bona fide “emotional support animal." The bill would establish procedures and requirements for a person with a disability to get an emotional support animal certification, which among other things would require a health care professional who has been treating the individual for at least six months to attest to the validity of the need. This is all related to a 2015 law that requires the Department of Civil Rights to create an identification card, tag, and vest for a service animal (like a seeing-eye dog), which permits the owner to bring the animal into public accommodations where dogs are usually not allowed.
Received in the House on December 18, 2018
Referred to the House Health Policy Committee on December 18, 2018

Comments