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2017 House Bill 4583: Use "orphaned" fuel tank cleanup revenue for other purposes

Public Act 134 of 2017

Introduced by Rep. Mary Whiteford (R) on May 4, 2017 To divert money from a 7/8 cent per gallon gas tax originally levied to pay for cleanups of leaking underground fuel tanks abandoned decades earlier where no known party is liable ("orphan sites"). The revenue from this tax was the target of an earlier 2004 fund raid that earmarked most of the money for other state spending. This bill would also divert money to subsidies for current underground fuel tank owners who are liable for contamination that occurred before 2015; to developers of "brownfield" property with leaking tanks; and to local governments for cleanups related to past road work.   Official Text and Analysis.
Referred to the House Natural Resources Committee on May 4, 2017
Reported in the House on June 14, 2017 With the recommendation that the substitute (H-1) be adopted and that the bill then pass.
Amendment offered by Rep. Stephanie Chang (D) on June 20, 2017 To slightly expand one of the conditions of the proposed clean up cost reimbursements.
The amendment failed by voice vote in the House on June 20, 2017
Amendment offered by Rep. Stephanie Chang (D) on June 20, 2017 To expand the things for which the legislature can reimburse local governments using money from a gas tax that (supposedly) is collected for underground fuel tank cleanups, in a manner that would essentially allow anything that a majority of the House and Senate want, with the governor's approval.
The amendment failed by voice vote in the House on June 20, 2017
Amendment offered by Rep. Christine Greig (D) on June 20, 2017 To prohibit any leaking underground cleanup reimbursements from being authorized until the highest priority cleanups have all been completed.
The amendment failed by voice vote in the House on June 20, 2017
Amendment offered by Rep. William Sowerby (D) on June 20, 2017 To revise net worth calculations in a provision related to financial responsibility requirements for certain fuel tank owners.
The amendment failed by voice vote in the House on June 20, 2017
Passed 61 to 46 in the House on June 20, 2017.
    See Who Voted "Yes" and Who Voted "No".
(same description)
To divert money from a 7/8 cent per gallon gas tax originally levied to pay for cleanups of leaking underground fuel tanks abandoned decades earlier where no known party is liable ("orphan sites"). The revenue from this tax was the target of an earlier 2004 fund raid that earmarked most of the money for other state spending. This bill would also divert money to subsidies for current underground fuel tank owners who are liable for contamination that occurred before 2015; to developers of "brownfield" property with leaking tanks; and to local governments for cleanups related to past road work.
Received in the Senate on June 21, 2017
Referred to the Senate Natural Resources Committee on June 21, 2017
Reported in the Senate on September 26, 2017 With the recommendation that the bill pass.
Passed 26 to 10 in the Senate on October 10, 2017.
    See Who Voted "Yes" and Who Voted "No".
(same description)
To divert money from a 7/8 cent per gallon gas tax originally levied to pay for cleanups of leaking underground fuel tanks abandoned decades earlier where no known party is liable ("orphan sites"). The revenue from this tax was the target of an earlier 2004 fund raid that earmarked most of the money for other state spending. This bill would also divert money to subsidies for current underground fuel tank owners who are liable for contamination that occurred before 2015; to developers of "brownfield" property with leaking tanks; and to local governments for cleanups related to past road work.
Signed by Gov. Rick Snyder on October 26, 2017

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