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2013 House Bill 4808: Revise first degree murder lifer law for minors

Public Act 23 of 2014

Introduced by Rep. Margaret O'Brien (R) on June 6, 2013 To revise the application to minors of the state‚Äôs mandatory life imprisonment for first degree murder law, so as to conform with the U.S. Supreme Court decision in Miller v Alabama. A Senate Fiscal Agency memo describes the ruling and its application to Michigan law. This bill is part of a package, and would address the prospective application of the ruling going forward.   Official Text and Analysis.
Referred to the House Criminal Justice Committee on June 6, 2013
Reported in the House on December 4, 2013 With the recommendation that the substitute (H-1) be adopted and that the bill then pass.
Substitute offered in the House on December 10, 2013
The substitute failed by voice vote in the House on December 10, 2013
Amendment offered by Rep. Margaret O'Brien (R) on December 10, 2013 To replace the previous version of the bill with one that revises details but does not change the substance as previously described.
The amendment passed by voice vote in the House on December 10, 2013
Passed 59 to 50 in the House on December 11, 2013
Received in the Senate on December 12, 2013
Referred to the Senate Judiciary Committee on December 12, 2013
Reported in the Senate on January 15, 2014 With the recommendation that the bill pass.
Amendment offered in the Senate on February 11, 2014 To tie-bar the bill to Senate Bill 319, meaning this bill cannot become law unless that one does also. SB 319 contains provisions specifying the terms of less-than-life sentences for these juvenile offenders.
The amendment passed by voice vote in the Senate on February 11, 2014
Passed 35 to 3 in the Senate on February 12, 2014 To revise Michigan's mandatory life sentence with no chance of parole for certain very serious crimes committed by minors. The bill is linked to Senate Bill 319, which would make life without parole no longer be automatic in these cases, but prosecutors could request it. Otherwise, the minimum sentence would be 25 to 40 years, and the maximum at least 60 years. This and SB 319 respond to the U.S. Supreme Court's Miller v Alabama decision. The bills would not apply the new standard retroactively to the approximately 350 current prisoners in this category, but include a provision authorizing parole hearings for them if a future ruling requires this.
Received in the House on February 12, 2014
Passed 60 to 50 in the House on February 13, 2014
Signed by Gov. Rick Snyder on March 4, 2014

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