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2003 House Bill 4234: Allow personal property tax break for businesses
Introduced by Rep. Glenn Steil, Jr. (R) on February 18, 2003 To exempt businesses from paying personal property tax (property tax on capital equipment) on property valued less than $5,000 taxable value. This is approximately $10,000 in market value. "Approximate" because taxable value is capped by the rate of inflation, so equipment which may have appreciated by a larger amount will not be taxed at the full market value. The so-called “personal property tax” is assessed on the tools and capital equipment used by a business, and is levied in the same manner as regular real estate property taxes.   Official Text and Analysis.
Referred to the House Tax Policy Committee on February 18, 2003
Reported in the House on February 26, 2004 With the recommendation that the substitute (H-1) be adopted and that the bill then pass.
Substitute offered in the House on April 1, 2004 To replace the previous version of the bill with one that incorporates technical changes. This version was subsequently superceded by another substitute with substantive changes.
The substitute passed by voice vote in the House on April 1, 2004
Substitute offered by Rep. Lorence Wenke (R) on April 1, 2004 To replace the previous version of the bill with one that only allows a business with gross receipts of $5 million or less to take the proposed exemption, and only allows the exemption for one of the firm's locations.
The substitute passed by voice vote in the House on April 1, 2004
Amendment offered by Rep. Chris Ward (R) on April 1, 2004 To establish the exemption at $7,500 as measured by its state equalized value.
The amendment passed by voice vote in the House on April 1, 2004
Amendment offered by Rep. Chris Ward (R) on May 13, 2004 To clarify that the tax exemption only applies if all of a firm’s personal property, including that of affiliates elsewhere in the state, is valued less than $7,500 as measured by its state equalized value.
Amendment offered by Rep. Bruce Caswell (R) on May 13, 2004 To allow local assessors to exempt businesses that have declared they have less than $7,500 in personal property (measured by SEV) from filing personal property statements for the next three years.
Amendment offered by Rep. Gary Woronchak (R) on May 13, 2004 To require the state to reimburse local governments and the school aid fund for any revenue they do not collect as a result of this exemption.
Passed 59 to 46 in the House on May 13, 2004 To exempt a business from paying personal property tax (property tax on capital equipment) if all its business related property, including that of affiliates elsewhere in the state, is valued less than $7,500 as measured by its state equalized value, which is approximately half of the market value. The state would be required to reimburse local governments and the school aid fund for any revenue they do not collect as a result of this exemption. The so-called “personal property tax” is assessed on the tools and capital equipment used by a business, and is levied in the same manner as regular real estate property taxes .
Received in the Senate on May 18, 2004
Referred to the Senate Finance Committee on May 18, 2004
Reported in the Senate on June 8, 2004 With the recommendation that the bill pass.

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