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2017 Senate Bill 335: Revise campaign finance law to reflect Citizens United ruling

Public Act 119 of 2017

Introduced by Sen. David Robertson (R) on April 27, 2017 To revise Michigan campaign finance law provisions that violate the holding of the U.S. Supreme Court in the Citizens United case. The decision limited the power of congress and state legislatures to restrict election-related political speech by corporations, under a definition that includes non-profit groups motivated by ideological or political concerns.
The bill would authorize “independent expenditure committees” (dubbed "super-PACs") that could advocate for a candidate or ballot initiative but not contribute to or coordinate with a candidate. Candidates could solicit money for those committees, however. Committees would be subject to campaign finance filings but would not have to disclose the identity of donors, and there would be no cap on spending or contributions, which could come from corporations and unions.   Official Text and Analysis.
Referred to the Senate Elections and Government Reform Committee on April 27, 2017
Reported in the Senate on May 9, 2017 With the recommendation that the substitute (S-1) be adopted and that the bill then pass.
Amendment offered in the Senate on September 6, 2017 To remove a provision that would give the bill effect 90 days after it is enacted.
The amendment passed by voice vote in the Senate on September 6, 2017
Amendment offered by Sen. Steve Bieda (D) on September 14, 2017 To tie-bar the bill to Senate Concurrent Resolution 22, meaning this bill cannot become law unless that measure does also. SCR 22 would urge congress to enact measures that impose spending caps and donor disclosure requirements on "Super-Pacs," and adopt other measures that seek to get around the holding of the U.S. Supreme Court in the Citizens United case.
The amendment failed 12 to 23 in the Senate on September 14, 2017.
    See Who Voted "Yes" and Who Voted "No".
Passed 23 to 12 in the Senate on September 14, 2017.
    See Who Voted "Yes" and Who Voted "No".
(same description)
To revise Michigan campaign finance law provisions that violate the holding of the U.S. Supreme Court in the Citizens United case. The decision limited the power of congress and state legislatures to restrict election-related political speech by corporations, under a definition that includes non-profit groups motivated by ideological or political concerns.
The bill would authorize “independent expenditure committees” (dubbed "super-PACs") that could advocate for a candidate or ballot initiative but not contribute to or coordinate with a candidate. Candidates could solicit money for those committees, however. Committees would be subject to campaign finance filings but would not have to disclose the identity of donors, and there would be no cap on spending or contributions, which could come from corporations and unions
.
Received in the House on September 14, 2017
Referred to the House Elections and Ethics Committee on September 14, 2017
Reported in the House on September 19, 2017 Without amendment and with the recommendation that the bill pass.
Amendment offered by Rep. Jon Hoadley (D) on September 19, 2017 To prohibit companies that receive benefits from a particular state corporate welfare program enacted earlier in 2017 from contributing to one of the "super-PACs" the bill would authorize.
The amendment failed by voice vote in the House on September 19, 2017
Amendment offered by Rep. Vanessa Guerra (D) on September 19, 2017 To require the Secretary of State to investigate when "super-PAC" contributions are made by a person who "engages an attorney, vendor, or other agent that is also or has been engaged by that candidate or committee".
The amendment failed by voice vote in the House on September 19, 2017
Amendment offered by Rep. Jeremy Moss (D) on September 19, 2017 To tie-bar the bill to a package of bills that would extend the Freedom of Information Act's disclosure requirements to the legislature and more, meaning this bill cannot become law unless those ones did also. The bills are House Bills 4148 to 4157.
The amendment failed by voice vote in the House on September 19, 2017
Amendment offered by Rep. Adam Zemke (D) on September 19, 2017 To tie-bar the bill to House Bill 4345, meaning this bill cannot become law unless that one does also. HB 4345 would require candidates for many offices to file extensive and detailed disclosures about their personal and family finances.
The amendment failed by voice vote in the House on September 19, 2017
Amendment offered by Rep. Yousef Rabhi (D) on September 19, 2017 To tie-bar the bill to House Bill 4365, meaning this bill cannot become law unless that one does also. HB 4365 would mandate that as a condition of being placed on the ballot in Michigan, candidates for President of the United States must submit their tax returns from the past five years to the Michigan Secretary of State, who would have to post them online.
The amendment failed by voice vote in the House on September 19, 2017
Substitute offered by Rep. Darrin Camilleri (D) on September 19, 2017 To adopt a substitute that would limit "super-PAC" contributions to $1.
The substitute failed by voice vote in the House on September 19, 2017
Substitute offered by Rep. Adam Zemke (D) on September 19, 2017
The substitute failed by voice vote in the House on September 19, 2017
Passed 62 to 45 in the House on September 19, 2017.
    See Who Voted "Yes" and Who Voted "No".
(same description)
To revise Michigan campaign finance law provisions that violate the holding of the U.S. Supreme Court in the Citizens United case. The decision limited the power of congress and state legislatures to restrict election-related political speech by corporations, under a definition that includes non-profit groups motivated by ideological or political concerns.
The bill would authorize “independent expenditure committees” (dubbed "super-PACs") that could advocate for a candidate or ballot initiative but not contribute to or coordinate with a candidate. Candidates could solicit money for those committees, however. Committees would be subject to campaign finance filings but would not have to disclose the identity of donors, and there would be no cap on spending or contributions, which could come from corporations and unions
.
Signed by Gov. Rick Snyder on September 20, 2017

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