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2015 House Bill 4629: Repeal “bond” requirement to contest civil asset forfeiture

Public Act 418 of 2016

Introduced by Rep. Peter Lucido (R) on May 20, 2015 To repeal a requirement that a property owner whose property has been seized by police and is subject to “civil forfeiture” must provide a cash bond in order to contest the taking, and if the challenge is unsuccessful, must pay all the expenses of the proceedings. Under civil forfeiture laws, police can seize any property that may be associated with a crime using an extremely broad definition, and then keep the property (or the proceeds from its sale) even if the owner is never convicted or even charged with a crime.   Official Text and Analysis.
Referred to the House Judiciary Committee on May 20, 2015
Reported in the House on January 26, 2016 With the recommendation that the bill be referred to the Committee on Oversight and Ethics.
Referred to the House Oversight and Ethics Committee on January 26, 2016
Reported in the House on February 23, 2016 With the recommendation that the substitute (H-1) be adopted and that the bill then pass.
Passed 100 to 7 in the House (see names) on March 22, 2016 To repeal a requirement that a property owner whose property has been seized by police and is subject to “civil forfeiture” must provide a cash bond in order to contest the taking, and if the challenge is unsuccessful, must pay all the expenses of the proceedings. Under civil forfeiture laws, police can seize and keep any property that may be associated with a crime and keep the property - or the proceeds from its sale - even if the owner is never convicted or even charged with a crime.
Received in the Senate on March 23, 2016
Referred to the Senate Judiciary Committee on March 23, 2016
Reported in the Senate on May 12, 2016 With the recommendation that the substitute (S-1) be adopted and that the bill then pass.
Passed 29 to 8 in the Senate (see names) on December 14, 2016 (same description)
To repeal a requirement that a property owner whose property has been seized by police and is subject to “civil forfeiture” must provide a cash bond in order to contest the taking, and if the challenge is unsuccessful, must pay all the expenses of the proceedings. Under civil forfeiture laws, police can seize and keep any property that may be associated with a crime and keep the property - or the proceeds from its sale - even if the owner is never convicted or even charged with a crime.
Received in the House on December 14, 2016
Passed 101 to 7 in the House (see names) on December 15, 2016 To concur with the Senate-passed version of the bill.
Signed by Gov. Rick Snyder on January 3, 2017

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