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2011 Senate Bill 637: Require school Pledge of Allegiance recitation

Public Act 320 of 2012

  1. Introduced by Sen. Roger Kahn (R) on September 13, 2011, to require classes in public schools to recite the Pledge of Allegiance each day. The bill would prohibit compelling a student to recite the pledge.
    • Referred to the Senate Education Committee on September 13, 2011.
      • Reported in the Senate on November 10, 2011, with the recommendation that the substitute (S-1) be adopted and that the bill then pass.
    • Substitute offered in the Senate on November 10, 2011, to adopt a substitute version of the bill that also requires schools to ensure that a student who doesn't say the pledge isn't bullied for it. The substitute passed by voice vote in the Senate on November 10, 2011.
    • Amendment offered by Sen. Hoon-Yung Hopgood (D) on November 10, 2011, to require that students have an opportunity to say the pledge, but not require them to say it. The amendment failed 11 to 25 in the Senate on November 10, 2011.
      Who Voted "Yes" and Who Voted "No"

  2. Passed 31 to 5 in the Senate on November 10, 2011, to require students in public schools to recite the Pledge of Allegiance each day. However, the bill would prohibit compelling a student to recite the pledge if parents or the student complains, and would require schools to ensure that a student who doesn't say the pledge is not bullied for it. It would also requires flags in each classroom and over each school building.
    Who Voted "Yes" and Who Voted "No"

  3. Received in the House on November 10, 2011.
    • Referred to the House Education Committee on November 10, 2011.
      • Reported in the House on June 6, 2012, with the recommendation that the substitute (H-1) be adopted and that the bill then pass.
    • Substitute offered in the House on September 12, 2012, to replace the previous version of the bill with one that revises various details. This version was superseded by another substitute with more changes. The substitute failed by voice vote in the House on September 12, 2012.
    • Substitute offered by Rep. Kevin Cotter (R) on September 12, 2012, to adopt a version of the bill that only has the flag provision, with the pledge provision now in House Bill 4934. The substitute passed by voice vote in the House on September 12, 2012.
    • Amendment offered by Rep. Vicki Barnett (D) on September 12, 2012, to require the state to reimburse local school districts for the cost of the flags the bill would require. The amendment failed by voice vote in the House on September 12, 2012.
    • Amendment offered by Rep. Vicki Barnett (D) on September 12, 2012, to require online charter "cyberschools" to display an image of the American flag on every web page. The amendment failed by voice vote in the House on September 12, 2012.
  4. Passed 102 to 6 in the House on September 12, 2012, to require there be an American flag in each classroom and over each school building.
    Who Voted "Yes" and Who Voted "No"

  5. Received in the Senate on September 13, 2012.
  6. Passed 32 to 6 in the Senate on September 20, 2012, to concur with the House-passed version of the bill.
    Who Voted "Yes" and Who Voted "No"

  7. Signed by Gov. Rick Snyder on October 5, 2012.

Comments

Re: 2011 Senate Bill 637 (Require school Pledge of Allegiance recitation )  by harrynevus on February 16, 2013 

 "Do not deprive a kid that loves his country and wants to express this love . . . "  What a cretin, you are Salad!  A 5 year old has only been speaking real words for 2 years when they enter kindergarten.  They don't know what a country is, let alone understand heartfelt love for a geopolitical theory of a defined homeland.  Many adults aren't sure what that means, either.  Ask any 10 year old what indivisible under God means.  The average 9th grader probably doesn't realize or understand what they've been forcibly "reciting" everyday for years on end.  And there's a whole lot of people that are asking, "Where's the justice?" or, "Why don't I have the liberty to call my income 'capital gains' ?" 


Besides, they haven't been deprived.  They've been taking the pledge every day, anyway.  So where's the problem?


The problem with this and all the other meaningless crap coming from our legislatiors is the clear indication that these morons are going to waste the next several years doing nothing, addressing nothing, accomplishing nothing, solving nothing.  What effort they do expend will be to help themselves with higher salaries, better healthcare, and lifelong benefits.  If they have any time left at all, they might spend it pushing Michigan back to the 1950's when men were white and women kept their mouths shut.  By then they'll be too tired to help the citizens of Michigan, help the working people, help the middle class.  They won't even think about the impoverished, the mentally ill, families falling apart, and homeless children.  But as you would say, we probably expect too much from government, anyway.



Re: 2011 Senate Bill 637 (Require school Pledge of Allegiance recitation )  by marcysmith on September 30, 2012 
I was thinking of becoming an officer, but in this moment I am studying programming. I read about this new Senate Bill. Under the new rule, a school failing to comply would lose its accreditation. It would apply to kindergarten through high school, but only public schools. Private schools would not be subject to the law, and would not risk losing their accreditation if they don't implement a daily Pledge of Allegiance.

Re: 2011 Senate Bill 637 (Require school Pledge of Allegiance recitation )  by Admin003 on September 20, 2012 
Senators Kahn, Richardville and Hildenbrand asked and were granted unanimous consent to make statements and moved that the statements be printed in the Journal.
The motion prevailed.
Senator Kahn’s statement is as follows:
Senate Bill No. 637 is the companion to House Bill No. 4934, which, I believe, we will be acting on shortly. This bill and its companion bill are bills that deal with the saying of the Pledge of Allegiance in our school system and the provision of flags in those schools. The flags can be within the classrooms where the pledge is said.
Michigan is one of seven states in the country that does not have some type of state law requiring the Pledge of Allegiance to be recited in public schools. Mr. President, most states do have a statute that calls for the pledge to be recited on a daily basis; in fact, more than 40 do so. With the passage of this bill, we will be providing that the state of Michigan enter on with its sister states, the group that, in fact, encourages, inculcates, and provides for the saying of the Pledge of Allegiance throughout the school systems and throughout all grades.
I ask that this bill be passed and its companion House Bill No. 4934 when it comes to Third Reading.


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