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2009 Senate Bill 222: Authorize school recreation property tax increase
Introduced by Sen. John Gleason (D) on February 12, 2009 To give school districts the power to increase property taxes by up to 1 mill for 20 years to operate swimming pools, recreation centers, auditoriums, conference centers, and more as part of a "recreation authority." A school millage election would be required. The tax increase could be used to operate existing school facilities and programs.   Official Text and Analysis.
Referred to the Senate Local, Urban, & State Affairs Committee on February 12, 2009
Reported in the Senate on March 5, 2009 With the recommendation that the bill pass.
Passed 37 to 0 in the Senate on March 19, 2009.
    See Who Voted "Yes" and Who Voted "No".
To give school districts the power to increase property taxes by up to 1 mill for 20 years to operate swimming pools, recreation centers, auditoriums, conference centers, and more as part of a "recreation authority." A school millage election would be required. The tax increase could be used to operate existing school facilities and programs. House Bill 4700 does the same thing and passed the House 68-41.
Received in the House on March 19, 2009
Referred to the House Education Committee on March 19, 2009
Reported in the House on February 23, 2009 Without amendment and with the recommendation what the bill pass.
Passed 65 to 42 in the House on May 26, 2009.
    See Who Voted "Yes" and Who Voted "No".
(same description)
To give school districts the power to increase property taxes by up to 1 mill for 20 years to operate swimming pools, recreation centers, auditoriums, conference centers, and more as part of a "recreation authority." A school millage election would be required. The tax increase could be used to operate existing school facilities and programs.
Motion by Rep. Dave Hildenbrand (R) on May 26, 2009 To give the bill immediate effect.
The motion failed 66 to 41 in the House on May 26, 2009.
    See Who Voted "Yes" and Who Voted "No".

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