Legislation watch
Mackinac Center for Public Policy
Capitol Building

2006 Senate Bill 1416: Mandate HPV vaccine for sixth grade girls
  1. Introduced by Sen. Beverly Hammerstrom (R) on September 12, 2006, to require the parents or guardian of every female child entering sixth grade in a public or nonpublic school to either have the child vaccinated with the human papillomavirus (HPV) vaccine, or sign a statement to the effect that he or she had received information schools would be required to distribute on the connection between HPV and cervical cancer, and had elected for the child not to receive the vaccine.
    • Referred to the Senate Health Policy Committee on September 12, 2006.
      • Reported in the Senate on September 19, 2006, with the recommendation that the bill pass.
    • Substitute offered in the Senate on September 20, 2006, to replace the previous version of the bill with one that would also establish a child immunization advisory committee in the Department of Community Health, with members appointed by legislative leaders and the governor. The committee would review and make recommendations to the legislature on new vaccinations that should be mandated for children (with opt-out provisions for parents who object for reasons of conscience). The legislature then would have 45 days to reject a recommendation. If there was no vote, the mandate-with-exceptions would go into effect. The substitute passed by voice vote in the Senate on September 20, 2006.
  2. Passed 36 to 1 in the Senate on September 20, 2006, to require the parents or guardian of every female child entering sixth grade in a public or nonpublic school to either have the child vaccinated with the human papillomavirus (HPV) vaccine, or sign a statement to the effect that he or she had received information schools would be required to distribute on the connection between HPV and cervical cancer, and had elected for the child not to receive the vaccine. The bill would also establish a child immunization advisory committee in the Department of Community Health, with members appointed by legislative leaders and the governor. The committee would review and make recommendations to the legislature on new vaccinations that should be mandated for children (with opt-out provisions for parents who object for reasons of conscience). The legislature then would have 45 days to approve or reject a recommendation. If there was no vote, the mandate-with-exceptions would go into effect.
    Who Voted "Yes" and Who Voted "No"

  3. Received in the House on September 20, 2006.
    • Referred to the House Health Policy Committee on September 20, 2006.
      • Reported in the House on November 14, 2006, with the recommendation that the substitute (H-2) be adopted and that the bill then pass.
    • Substitute offered in the House on December 14, 2006. The substitute passed by voice vote in the House on December 14, 2006.
    • Amendment offered by Rep. Barb Vander Veen (R) on December 14, 2006, to require that the election by a parent to have their daughter get the vaccination must be in writing. The amendment passed by voice vote in the House on December 14, 2006.
  4. Passed 58 to 45 in the House on December 14, 2006, to require the parents or guardian of every female child entering sixth grade in a public or nonpublic school to either sign a permission form and have the child vaccinated by a health care provider with the human papillomavirus (HPV) vaccine, or obtain and present to school officials a certificate that they have elected for the child not to receive the vaccine. The bill would also establish a child immunization advisory committee in the Department of Community Health to make recommendations to the legislature on new vaccinations that should be mandated for children.
    Who Voted "Yes" and Who Voted "No"

  5. Moved to reconsider by Rep. Chris Ward (R) on December 14, 2006, the vote by which the House passed the bill, which means the first vote in which the bill was passed is vacated. The House voted a second time, and the bill did not pass. Passed by voice vote in the House on December 14, 2006.
  6. Received in the House on December 14, 2006.
  7. Failed 53 to 48 in the House on December 15, 2006, to require the parents or guardian of every female child entering sixth grade in a public or nonpublic school to either sign a permission form and have the child vaccinated by a health care provider with the human papillomavirus (HPV) vaccine, or obtain and present to school officials a certificate that they have elected for the child not to receive the vaccine.
    Who Voted "Yes" and Who Voted "No"

Comments

anonymous  by Anonymous Citizen on July 27, 2008 
hey bev you need to be voted out of office ,and give back all the money you received from drug companies

punish our daughters  by Anonymous Citizen on February 4, 2007 
ok, let's punish our daughters for choosing to abstain from purely recreational sex before she gets married.

and while we are at it, let's punish our SONS from doing the same thing. if more kids did a lot less "poking fun at people", we'd have lots less cases of cervical cancer.

what aids did for the sexual revolution, h.p.v. might just do for those that just want to "dog around".



imagine it...  by Anonymous Citizen on February 4, 2007 
hell, most people i know are LIVING IT.



View pre-2013 Comments.
Your new comments should be made in the box below.