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2005 House Bill 5237: Establish limited telecom regulation

Public Act 235 of 2005

Introduced by Rep. Mike Nofs (R) on September 27, 2005 To replace the expiring Michigan Telecommunications Act with a new law that only gives the Public Service Commission the authority to regulate rates basic residential phone service plans that include less than 100 call per month, and deregulates all other telecommunications services. This would still include basic consumer protection provisions of the old law, such as bans on “slamming,” “cramming,” and similar practices not specifically authorized by a customer. The bill would also restrict the authority of local governments and universities and public entities from providing telecommunications services generally provided by the private sector, such as internet service.   Official Text and Analysis.
Referred to the House Energy and Technology Committee on September 27, 2005
Reported in the House on October 20, 2005 With the recommendation that the substitute (H-3) be adopted and that the bill then pass.
Substitute offered in the House on October 20, 2005 To adopt a new version of the bill that still allows local governments to get into the internet service provider business if they cannot find three private firms willing to bid on providing service; “grandfathers” local governments that currently do this if at least 10 percent of residents use the service; lets schools and colleges offer such service with no new restrictions; retains regulation of wholesale rates charged to competitors by “incumbent” phone companies only through 2007; eliminates the separate "end user line charge" (EUCL) but allows providers to roll it into their rates if they demonstrate it is justified; requires providers that offer new technology services (like VOIP) to register with the state; prohibits charges for unlisted numbers; requires full disclosure of all fees and costs in a service plan; and more.
The substitute failed by voice vote in the House on October 20, 2005
Amendment offered by Rep. Leon Drolet (R) and Rep. Joe Hune (R) on October 20, 2005 To strip out the requirement that a phone company provide unlisted number service at no charge.
The amendment passed by voice vote in the House on October 20, 2005
Amendment offered by Rep. Jeff Mayes (D) and Rep. Tim Moore (R) on October 20, 2005 To revise details of the requirement that phone companies offer the "essential basic" phone service to certain low income people at discounted rates, and to also require the discounts be given to anyone receiving various forms of welfare assistance, including Medicaid, food stamps, etc.
The amendment passed by voice vote in the House on October 20, 2005
Amendment offered by Rep. Mike Nofs (R) on October 20, 2005 To strip out the requirement that internet service provided by a local government must be used by at least 10 percent of residents for it to be "grandfathered" and allowed to continue. This has the effect of "grandfathering" essentially any existing governmentally-provided internet service.
The amendment passed by voice vote in the House on October 20, 2005
Amendment offered by Rep. Shelley Goodman Taub (R) on October 20, 2005 To allow local governments to offer internet service without seeking competitive bids if the purpose is to "promote the public health, safety, and the provision of 'e-government' services".
The amendment passed by voice vote in the House on October 20, 2005
Passed 100 to 6 in the House on October 20, 2005 To replace the expiring Michigan Telecommunications Act with a new law that limits the regulation of retail telephone rates to an "essential basic" residential plan of 100 calls per month that every phone company would be required to provide, and eliminates most other regulations after 2007. The new law would still include consumer protections such as bans on “slamming” and “cramming,” etc. It would restrict but not prohibit local governments from getting into the internet service provider business.
Received in the Senate on October 25, 2005
Referred to the Senate on October 25, 2005
Amendment offered in the Senate on November 3, 2005 To add additional restrictions and requirements for phone company actions involving certain customers who have the "essential basic" phone service, and require phone companies to disclose more information to these customers regarding what happens if they exceed the 100-outgoing calls limit.
The amendment passed by voice vote in the Senate on November 3, 2005
Amendment offered by Sen. Mark Schauer (D) on November 3, 2005 To extend until Nov. 30, 2005 the deadline on local governments for initiating the process to enter the internet service provider business. This would allow a consortium of governments in the Grand Rapids area and elsewhere to enter the business. The bill restricts their ability to do so.
The amendment failed by voice vote in the Senate on November 3, 2005
Passed 38 to 0 in the Senate on November 3, 2005 To replace the expiring Michigan Telecommunications Act with a new law that limits the regulation of retail telephone rates to an "essential basic" residential plan of 100 calls per month that every phone company would be required to provide, and eliminates most other regulations after 2007. The new law would still include consumer protections such as bans on “slamming” and “cramming,” etc. It would restrict but not prohibit local governments from getting into the internet service provider business .
Received in the House on November 3, 2005 To concur with the Senate-passed version of the bill, which made only minor changes.
Passed 96 to 6 in the House on November 3, 2005
Signed by Gov. Jennifer Granholm on November 21, 2005

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